Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Crisis: Dignitas: The Manners of Humility by Fr. George W. Rutler

Indeed

It's Washington's Birthday, Not Presidents' Day by Gleaves Whitney


Washington vs. Lincoln by Brion McClanahan
Abraham Lincoln and George Washington stare silently at one another across the reflecting pool on the National Mall in Washington D.C., their paths inextricably linked by the historians who consider both to be the greatest… »


Russell Kirk wasn't right about everything... Abraham Lincoln and the Dignity of the Presidency
“This is our time of witness”: Abp Chaput on how American Catholics remain “strangers in a strange land” By Carl E. Olson

“It’s a time not for sadness but gratitude—and courage,” says the archbishop of Philadelphia in a discussion of his latest book on “Living the Catholic Faith in a Post-Christian World.”



Perhaps they are strangers in a strange land because they never fully assimilated and integrated with the natives...

Monday, February 20, 2017

A Lot of Star Power



But I can't relate to the characters at the moment... perhaps it would be good commentary about contemporary artists/musicians and their private lives.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Friday, February 17, 2017

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Psalm 94

As Bad as the USCCB?

Do immigrant churches have the interests of Americans (1.0) at heart?

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Lt. Gen. Hal Moore Has Passed

Kyrie eleison.

Daily Mail



A Better Means of Converting the United States?

Than the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches -- the Anglican Ordinarite. After all, the Ordinariate also encompasses Methodists and other English Protestant traditions that are offshoots of Anglicanism. At least the Anglican Ordinariate would respect the English heritage of the United States, and are better equipped than most ethnic jurisdictions of Orthodoxy and the neo-Yankee multicultural Roman Catholic Church to be inculturated into the Anglo-American cultures present in the United States. After all, how much inculturation would have to be done, since the Anglican Ordinariate is already Anglo-American? It is very likely that the Anglican Ordinariate respects the language, history, culture, and ethnic aspirations of the founding stock -- can the same be said of the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches?

One may wonder what the appointment of a Portuguese-American Roman Catholic as the ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter portends for its future. If bishops should be familiar with the culture of their flock, then how else can one explain his appointment (besides his familiarity with the workings of the ordinariate, especially the process of creating its liturgical books) than the assumption of American cultural homogeneity (especially under the influence of civic nationalism)? (And the myth of the "melting pot" in the large cities which were occupied by members of the immigrant Church.)

One is reminded of the importing foreign priests to serve in Roman Catholic parishes by bishops to staff their undermanned dioceses. What sort of education do they have in the culture and customs of the people whom they serve? Knowledge of Church teaching is not enough; they should also know and accept the valid customs of the native peoples.

Anyway, back to the Anglican Ordinariate -- some of the converts bring with them the English choral tradition, and Anglican plainchant in English. I have not been impressed by what I have heard, at least in the form adopted by a certain Roman Catholic seminary on the east coast -- that seemed to delicate and not manly enough. Maybe there wasn't a good mix of voices of different ranges.

(How difficult would it be to adapt Anglican chant to the Byzantine rite?)





His Book on the Benedict Option Will Be Out in a Month or So

Dreher: Catholics, Orthodox, & The Benedict Option

No discussion here of the immigrant Church dealing with inculturation and legitimation ethno-nationalism in the United States.

Leaving the Church Frame

Or another version of "why young adult groups are destined to fail as a way to network for people looking for a spouse."

Perhaps it is possible to exercise authority and charisma in a church setting in a way that is in accord with Christianity and nonetheless will attract women. If there is, I don't know what it is.

Usually the environment at church is too egalitarian and there is too much casual familiarity between members of the opposite sex -- or to be more accurate, the men are too nice while the women do not have any respect for the men. Why should they? The men are too nice, and the women are their equals in every other way. What male can stand out from the crowd, except maybe the nice Christian guy who is well-off. Then again, he may be a target for those women who are seeking to settle down but unable to generate any attraction to them. Especially if their 'native' culture emphasizes comfort and consumerism -- she who has the earning power will seek someone better, even if they themselves are blind to their own inclination. (Perhaps willingly blind.)

Do many Uhmerican Christians find themselves stuck in a "nice" mindset, or unable to break the shackles of the Church frame which prevents them from standing out as men? That the popularizers should continue to promote Theology of the Body instead of addressing the real issues between men and women accurately is a strike against Churches who have strayed from the wisdom of their forefathers.









Fabricated City

Monday, February 13, 2017

Abbeville Institute: The Continuing Relevance of Calhoun’s Wisdom by Clyde Wilson

I am always glad to talk about my favourite subject–-John C. Calhoun. I think it will become apparent that what he has to say has some relevance to our topic “Building Communities of Resistance”—and perhaps… »

Archbishop Chaput Has a New Book

CWR: "Facts" and "values" and darkness at noon By Abp Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap.
The moral conflicts that permeate our public policy debates are endless and irresolvable because our culture no longer has a rational, mutually accepted way of getting to moral agreement, writes Philadelphia’s Archbishop Charles Chaput in this exclusive excerpt from his new book.


(Editor’s Note: The following is an excerpt from Archbishop Charles Chaput’s forthcoming book Strangers in a Strange Land: Living the Catholic Faith in a Post-Christian World (Henry Holt and Co.). The book will be available February 21.)

CWR Dispatch: “Strangers in a Strange Land”: Chaput on Catholics weathering a sea change in American life by Michael J. Miller
In his new book, Abp Chaput writes from his unique position to examine the interface between Catholic faith and morals, on the one hand, and today’s aggressively secular American society on the other.

If this is the best that "conservative" American bishops to do, there is little reason to think that the Catholic Church will be able to do anything to change things. The American Church doesn't understand the problem, or its own complicity in creating the problem.

SJW Disney Promoting Homosexualist Agenda

When We Rise


EW

Sunday, February 12, 2017

The BSA is Converged

Girl Boy Scouts … and 71 Other “Gender” Options by Paul Kengor

The Boy Scouts of America has announced a major policy reversal, a rather dramatic shift in the foundational policy of the organization. It is now accepting girls as Boy Scouts. Yes, girl [...]