Saturday, October 24, 2009

Damian Thompson: James MacMillan puts Scottish bishops on the spot over Latin Masses and With his daring scheme for Anglicans, Benedict XVI fulfils the hopes of Cardinal Newman
Robert Moynihan: Letter #40, from Rome, Requiescat
Sad News: The mother of the Pope's personal secretary has passed away
Unlearning the CIA By CHRISTOPHER KETCHAM
The Education of Bob Baer

When Hollywood came calling after the success of “See No Evil” and Syriana went into production in 2004, Baer snagged a cameo role, playing an FBI agent. He had one line, demanding George Clooney give up his “passports” – in the plural – and he kept flubbing it. There are a lot of ex-CIA officers who tell me they’ve laughed at the Syriana version of the CIA, among them Bob Baer.


His future plans?

Baer’s dissenting voice is small in the scrum of interests in Washington. That’s why he’s in Silverton. He suggests the CIA transfer its headquarters to the mountains, to live in the hard cold winter and get a grip on reality, lose some fat. I get the impression he no longer believes in US power as currently configured. Perhaps he has come full circle from traveling the world with his mom. He tells me he might run for county sheriff and that his first official act is that he will “no longer enforce federal laws.” He tells me, “We're a country of isolationists. We don't do empires. So we come home. Build the perfect electric car, give away solar panels, retool the assholes on Wall Street to build public transportation.” He’s got his new daughter Khyber to take care of, and his wife Dayna. He has a new pair of skis. As we walked into the mountains, snow started falling. The peaks would soon be covered, and the valley. Baer could go skiing.
Challenging the Dollar Dictatorship By NIKOLAS KOZLOFF
An Interview with Economist Ethan Kaplan
Sustainable Agriculture Whitepaper (excerpt)
Jason Bradford, Phd. and Craig Wichner, Farmland LP

Developing a sustainable agriculture is a necessary part of creating a sustainable society. The root of the word sustainable is the verb, to sustain, which means to nourish and prolong. In social and environmental contexts we say something is sustainable when we believe it can persist indefinitely without exhausting resources or causing lasting damage.

The Thinking Houswife on The Unfaithful Wife.

Friday, October 23, 2009

Mike Whitney, The Great Dollar Collapse Debate
I was thinking of all money I could have saved if I hadn't moved into the room -- at least $12,000 over 2 years. Maybe that's insignificant compared to what most working people in California spend on rent, but that's still a big chunk of change to me. Even if I had to spend some of it on storage and other expenses, I'd probably have $8,000 left to save or to spend on other "more important" things. And if I hadn't been living in the room, I probably could have avoided certain setbacks that have delayed my entry into the "real world." These are not pleasant things to think about. Ah well, what can you do. Let's just see if I can get some things back on track.

Michael Shedlock: How Being The Slightest Bit Overqualified Can Cost You A Job
The Western Confucian posts some video clips featuring Korean chant: Korea's Inculturated Office of the Dead.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Zed @ The Spearhead: The Baby Bomb: How the Boomers were Used to Demolish a Culture

If there is anything missingn from the narrative, it is the story of the alliance between government and the wealthy, the oligopoly, and the centralization of political and economic power.
How does a website like this get its information (with people's addresses and phone numbers)? And by what right is it allowed to post this information on the Internet?
Sarge, you need to become a player for Bayern München.



Bayern Munich's striker Mario Gomez and his girlfriend Silvia Meichel, dressed in traditional Bavarian clothes, pose in a beer tent at the Oktoberfest during the Bayern Munich football team's annual visit to the famous beer festival, on October 4, 2009 in Munich, southern Germany. (Getty/Daylife)


Bayern Munich's midfielder Andreas Ottl and his girlfriend, dressed in traditional Bavarian clothes, pose at the Oktoberfest during the Bayern Munich football team's annual visit to the famous beer festival, on October 4, 2009 in Munich, southern Germany. (Getty/Daylife)

Bayern Munich's Dutch midfielder Mark van Bommel and his wife Andra, dressed in traditional Bavarian clothes, pose in a beer tent at the Oktoberfest during the Bayern Munich football team's annual visit to the famous beer festival, on October 4, 2009 in Munich, southern Germany. (Getty/Daylife)


Fußball-Club Bayern München
Asia Times: China's navy sails past India's dock
Three Chinese naval vessels do not make a fleet, but they do make a statement. By sending them to patrol off the coast of Somalia as part of the multinational force operating there, in effect, China is saying to India, "We're back." - Peter J Brown (Oct 21, '09)
Planning for Water Contingencies
Gail Tverberg, The Oil Drum

We know that fresh water is essential to life. While we can survive for weeks without food, even a few days without water can be a problem. One rule of thumb as to the amount of water needed for drinking is two quarts (1.9 liters) per person per day. If one includes uses other than drinking, obviously more is needed.

The Race Goes Not Always To The Fastest
Gene Logsdon, OrganicToBe.org

I am not a real farmer, my neighbors say, because I don’t do it for money. That’s almost funny because the economists are saying that nobody’s farming for money this year. Although the corn crop is good in most of the midwest, there’s not much profit in it. Some go as far as projecting that on average, corn farmers will lose $8 per acre over the whole midwest. If that is the case, I’m not a real farmer for sure because I figure on netting $550 an acre on my corn.

(original)

AmP: Background: Abp. Di Noia asked dominicans for Anglican reunification prayers


Archbishop Joseph Augustine Di Noia, Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments attends a news conference at the Vatican, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2009. Pope Benedict XVI approved a new church provision that will allow Anglicans to convert while maintaining many of their distinctive spiritual and liturgical traditions. The new Catholic church structures, called Personal Ordinariates, will be units of faithful established within local Catholic Churches, headed by former Anglican prelates who will provide spiritual care for Anglicans who wish to be Catholic. (AP/Daylife)

Cardinal William Levada, right, the Vatican's chief doctrinal official, flanked by Archbishop Joseph Augustine Di Noia, Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, speaks at a news conference at the Vatican, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2009. The Vatican has made it easier for Anglicans to join the Catholic Church, responding to the disillusionment of some Anglicans over the election of openly gay bishops and the blessing of same-sex unions. Pope Benedict XVI approved a new church provision that will allow Anglicans to convert while maintaining many of their distinctive spiritual and liturgical traditions, Cardinal William Levada, the Vatican's chief doctrinal official, told a news conference Tuesday. (AP/Daylife)
Hestia writes:

American women seem to age super-duper fast. What is up with that?
A carb heavy diet, a lack of healthful dietary fats, a lack of exercise, and an obsession with clean skin are all likely culprits. If you look at the beauty regimes used in other parts of the world, they focus on techniques and products that are beneficial for hygiene, good health, and aging gracefully. They include eating well, being well-hydrated, and moisturizing, moisturizing, moisturizing. Their lifestyles are also a bit more sane and health promoting than that of the typical American.

In America, beauty regimes don’t focus on these basic common sense must-dos. Instead, American women are all about obsessively cleansing their skin with harsh alcohol based toners and caustic soaps that strip the skin of beneficial oil. Sunscreen use is also not as prevalent in the US as it is in other parts of the world. Many women seem to think SPF 15 in their foundation is sufficient, when this doesn’t provide any real sun protection at all.

And then there is the obsession with tanning, both in the lying in the sun form and artificial tanning beds. Both cause immediate damage in the form of dry, irritated skin that becomes temperamental and out of balance and of course the long term wrinkles and damage that will result in later years.

The damage does come quicker than many realize. I’ve never laid out in the sun or went to a tanning bed and wear sun protection religiously, in the form of clothing, hats, and sunscreen. Many of my high school classmates did not and now at just 23-25ish, you can tell the difference between us. I’m even mistaken for being sixteen quite frequently. I’m not sure who these folks think the three year old child is…maybe my sister? LOL. In later years this will surely be more dramatic. My parents are both fair and have never sun worshiped either and they both look dramatically younger than their peers. My dad will be 58 this week and people routinely think he is in this forties. My mom turned fifty earlier this year and is mistaken for being much younger as well.

People in many countries also maintain a fitness level as part of their lifestyle, rather than focusing on the hardcore and damaging routines that are part of American fitness. Think of the many people wh0 walk or ride bikes as their usual form of transportation. If you do this in the States as I do (we only have one vehicle and my husband uses it; my vehicle is my bike with seat for my daughter, our feet, our the bus), you are a real oddity. Such a lifestyle is just not possible for many people, due to a lack of public transit or an area that is not walker friendly, but for many Americans, they are just too lazy to stroll 1/4 mile on a nice day to pick up a gallon of milk.

Fr. Z: Details about the new Compendium Eucharisticum
Sandro Magister on the Anglican ordinariates: Knock, and It Shall Be Opened to You. As Long As It's According to Tradition

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Reuters: Modern man a wimp says anthropologist
JMG, Strange Bright Banners

The conventional wisdom, like most great fallacies, begins with a truth and stretches it until it becomes for all practical purposes a falsehood. The truth, one of the great achievements of the last three hundred years of thought, is the recognition that human life comprises a number of separate spheres that overlap solely in the life of the individual. Most of us have learned, for example, that when a religious leader makes statements concerning matters of scientific fact, those statements deserve no more (albeit no less) respect than those of any other interested layperson, and if the religious leader claims divine sanction for his opinions, he has overstepped the proper bounds of religion. (We are still in the process of learning that the reverse is also true, and a scientist who attempts to claim the prestige of science for an attack on religion is equally out of line.)
Except this denies the possibility of Divine Revelation.
Wind powered factories: history (and future) of industrial windmills
Kris De Decker, Low-tech Magazine

In the 1930s and 1940s, decades after steam engines had made wind power obsolete, Dutch researchers obstinately kept improving the – already very sophisticated – traditional windmill. The results were spectacular, and there is no doubt that today an army of ecogeeks could improve them even further. Would it make sense to revive the industrial windmill and again convert kinetic energy directly into mechanical energy?

(original)

NLM: Chant Camp by Anon. 4


I didn't go to the concert -- couldn't afford it. Ah well.
Pam Martens, The Next Financial Crisis Hits Wall Street: Judges Start Nixing Foreclosures
Rod Dreher: The financial and political oligarchy

Related links:
FRONTLINE: the warning: watch the full program online | PBS
Brooksley Born, Finally on the Record : CJR
Brooksley Born, the Cassandra of the Derivatives Crisis

STANFORD Magazine: March/April 2009 > Features > Brooksley Born
John Médaille, The “One Salvation” of Ludwig von Mises

Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Ed Peters offers his First thoughts on an Anglican ordinariate (via Fr. Z). Having read comments posted at various blogs, Mr. Peter is not alone when he claims:

In any case, the idea of a "personal ordinariate" is another sign of the (I think) inevitable trend away from purely territorial jurisdictional units in the Roman Church and toward greater use of personal jurisdiction. This trend has been evident in western canon law at least since the late 1960s (see, e.g., 1967 Synod of Bishops, "Principles Guiding the Revision of Canon Law", no. 8) and is reflected in the 1983 Code (e.g., 1983 CIC 372, 518). Provided this shift is pursued in an orderly manner, I think it a step in the right direction for people who are coming to see themselves as less identified with various locales, and more with social groupings. Certainly several other groups in the Church will be watching the Anglican project with an eye to applying innovative structures in their own spheres.


Fr. Louis Bouyer addresses this trend in his The Church of God: Body of Christ and Temple of the Spirit. While he concedes the usefulness of extraterritorial parishes and ecclesial movements, nonetheless he beliefs that the locality of the parish and diocese must be maintained. Peter Karl T. Perkins believes that a canonical structure such as the one being offered to Anglicans seeking communion with the Church of Rome should also be offered as part of the solution for the FSSPX problem:

Jean, it is NOT, NOT, NOT, NOT, NOT a prelature, personal or otherwise. It is a personal ordinariate: or-din-Air-ee-et. Say it. Think it. Memorise it. And get that nonsense from the media out of your head. They can't get the word 'prelature' out of their mindless heads because they are mentally retarded buffoons.

A personal prelature would have been a disaster because it is NOT what the church calls a 'particular church'; that is, it is not a diocese or its equivalent. A personal ordinariate IS equivalent to a diocese for its subjects.

With a personal prelature, you need the permission of the local Roman nutcase bishop to set up a parish. Every single time Opus Dei wants a parish or mission in a diocese, it needs permission from the local Roman ordinary. That is not this. Thank God! Alleluia!

Not to be too prideful but Fr. Z. is just now discovering what I have been arguing for since 1997, both for the T.L.M. and for the TAC. Fr. Z. still can't get it straight. For example, he recently suggested that these people would get the Anglican Use liturgy. That is definitely not the case. They hate the A.U. Liturgy approved in 1983 by Rome--and rightly so. I suspect that they will get, for the time being, there current liturgies but with the Roman Canon substituting for whatever they use.

Z. is right that this will be a model for the rest of us and that is GREAT news. I'm glad that others are slowly and gradually coming to realise this. There will be no personal prelatures--no traps!--for us. The way forward is this new personal ordinariate structure.

The Campos structure IS equivalent to a diocese. It is an 'ritual' apostolic administration. That is goooood. It is very good.

Military ordinariates are also good, very good.

The new personal ordinariates are good, they are good, they are good indeed.

Opus Dei has a personal prelature, which is baaaad, very bad--bad, at least, for it. It originally asked for a structure which would have been a particular church but this was rejected by Rome. They took what they could get. I don't like Opus Dei very much, so I am happy that they failed to get the right structure.

Once again, let us STOP comparing this new structure to the Opus Dopus personal prelature. No matter what it takes, I will bang this distinction into people's heads until they surrender. I will NEVER allow those morons in the media to fudge this crucial distinction. In the end, however, it doesn't matter if people can't get it straight. Under this new structure, the incoming Anglican ordinaries will not need permission from the local Roman ordinaries to establish parishes or apostolates. Period. That's what counts. Sir Humphrey Appleby said that truth is irrelevant: only appearances count. But he was wrong and we shall soon see how wrong!
See Mr. Perkins's blog for a longer explanation of this proposal.

Now, regardless of whether this new canonical structure is useful for the FSSPX to be restored to full communion with the Church, how does this square with the observance of the canon that there is to be one bishop for one diocese or territory? The Orthodox themselves rightly perceive that this is a problem in the United States, and they seek to resolve it in accordance with the ancient canon. But the Catholic Church seems to be going in the opposite direction. This is not to say that there are not pastoral needs being addressed by the creation of such structures, but I question whether it should be ideal or permanent. In a world with more saints, such structures may not be necessary, just as it may not be necessary for there to be bishops of different rites all in the same city. One bishop would have the care of all Christians in his diocese, while they could keep their particular liturgical rites and this attachment would be rightly respected by the bishop.

The age of mobility will eventually come to an end with the end of the age of cheap energy. But I don't expect the Church to adjust to that new reality until it happens.
American Papist has some video clips of today's press conferences on the new Anglican Personal Ordinariates. See also Creative Minority Report for posts.
Equal Time with Carl Etnier: Rural Vermont's New Directions, Plus Produce: The New Urban Agriculture

Carl Etnier, Equal Time Radio

Brian Moyer, the new executive director of Rural Vermont, explains how the organization plans to follow up on their legislative successes by making sure the laws about raw milk, on-farm slaughter, and other aspects of farming are working as intended and helping family farmers. City planner and designer Darrin Nordahl says cities, towns, and villages should not only let people grow food in the margins of urban areas, they should pay their staff to grow food on public land. Nordahl talks about his new book, Public Produce: The New Urban Agriculture.

(original)

mp3

Sustainable Medicine and Peak Oil, Part Two
Dan Bednarz, Health after Oil

In this interview, Didi Pershouse of the Center for Sustainable Medicine is interviewed by Dan Bednarz of Health After Oil about the Cuban health care system, peak oil, free medical schools, community acupuncture, cholesterol myths, and how working-class values and owning-class values play out in different models of health care. It is a continuation of a conversation titled “Peak Oil and Sustainable Medicine, Part One...

(original)

The Cuban health care system is cited as a model. It is the subject of the documentary, Salud.


Patrick Deneen, Subsidizing Localism?

For those who have called upon FPR to consider practical ways of applying its philosophy to the “real world,” I would submit that we must begin to think creatively about the current role that our central government might play not in continuing to support the expansion of private and public power alike, but fostering localism (and thereby restricting both concentrations of power). Given, this would seem to be going against its basic grain of the past 200+ years of expansion and concentration, but recent events suggest (to me) that we need a serious reconsideration of the basic purpose and ends of government. However, simple opposition to “Gummint” is, in my view, a romantic fantasy that simply plays into the hands of concentrations of private power.
PJB, Middle American Radicals

The Oath Keepers are also mentioned at LRC Blog.

Related links:
Oath Keepers Declaration of Orders
'Oath Keepers' sworn to uphold Constitution no matter what
archives
NLM: Compendium of the Reforms of the Roman Breviary, 1568-1961: Part 6.3 - The First Liturgical Movement

It has often been remarked that in the particular case of the Second Vatican Council, it is the spirit that killeth, and the letter that giveth life. In their very first document, the constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, the Council fathers asked that the Divine Office be prayed in common even by those clerics who are not obliged to do so by law, that it be sung when possible, and that “the chief hours, especially Vespers, (be) celebrated in common in church on Sundays and the more solemn feasts.” Like most of Sacrosanctum Concilium, this exhortation has been more or less universally ignored; choral celebration of the Divine Office is far rarer nowadays than it was even in 1962. The “Liturgy of the Hours” promulgated in the wake of the Council is the most thorough-going revision of the Office since it first came into existence. Despite radical abbreviation in virtually every quarter, which ought to have facilitated the singing of the Office, it has all but ceased to be the public prayer of the Church in any meaningful sense.
Ralph McInerny, Inconclusive Postscript
(on Newman and Søren Kierkegaard)
The Ecotechnic Future (book excerpt)
John Michael Greer, New Society Publishers
Libera/Winchester Cathedral Choir - Te lucis/Vespera
Jeffrey Steel, the Anglican priest who converted earlier this year, is still blogging: De Cura Animarum. He has some links for today's big announcement, but no personal posts yet.

New canonical structure to be set up for Anglicans seeking communion with the Bishop of Rome

Deo Gratias!

NLM: Personal Ordinariates for Anglicans Entering the Catholic Church

Rorate Caeli: Anglican-Vatican Rumblings, NOTE OF THE CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH ABOUT PERSONAL ORDINARIATES FOR ANGLICANS ENTERING THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, Initial Reaction from Anglo-Catholics, Editorial Note: Time is Up

Damian Thompson: Pope announces plans for Anglicans to convert en masse, New era begins as Benedict throws open gates of Rome to disaffected Anglicans, Archbishop of Canterbury criticises Rome for springing this announcement on him

Fr. Z: Anglicans desiring unity will have “ordinariates”, Joint Statement of Archbps. Nichols (Catholic) and Williams (Anglican)

Scott Richert: Pope Benedict to Anglicans: Come Home to Rome, The End of the Anglican Communion, Saint Paul of the Cross and the Conversion of England

The Hermeneutic of Continuity: Anglican Personal Ordinariates

Atonement Online: Thanks Be to God!

Robert Moynihan on the press conference in Rome.

Sandro Magister: Bussate e vi sarà aperto. Purché secondo tradizione


Britain's Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, left, from the Anglican church listens as Archbishop of Westminster Vincent Nichols from the Roman Catholic Church speaks during a news conference in London, held in reaction to the announcement of a new church structure for Anglicans who want to join the Catholic Church, Tuesday Oct. 20, 2009. Pope Benedict XVI has created a new church structure for Anglicans who want to join the Catholic Church, responding to the disillusionment of some Anglicans over the ordination of women and the election of openly gay bishops. (AP/Daylife)

Britain's Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, center, and Bishop Christopher Hill, left, from the Anglican church listen as Archbishop of Westminster Vincent Nichols from the Roman Catholic Church speaks during a news conference in London, held in reaction to the announcement of a new church structure for Anglicans who want to join the Catholic Church, Tuesday Oct. 20, 2009. Pope Benedict XVI has created a new church structure for Anglicans who want to join the Catholic Church, responding to the disillusionment of some Anglicans over the ordination of women and the election of openly gay bishops. (AP/Daylife)

Cardinal William Joseph Levada gestures during a news conference at the Vatican October 20, 2009. Pope Benedict has approved a document that would make it easier for Anglicans to join the Roman Catholic Church. The move comes after years of discontent in the 70 milion-strong worldwide Anglican community about the liberal attitudes of some parts of the church towards women priest and homosexual bishops. (Reuters/Daylife)


Cardinal William Levada, the Vatican's chief doctrinal official, speaks at a news conference at the Vatican, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2009. The Vatican has made it easier for Anglicans to join the Catholic Church, responding to the disillusionment of some Anglicans over the election of openly gay bishops and the blessing of same-sex unions. Pope Benedict XVI approved a new church provision that will allow Anglicans to convert while maintaining many of their distinctive spiritual and liturgical traditions, Cardinal William Levada, the Vatican's chief doctrinal official, told a news conference Tuesday. (AP/Daylife)

Fr. Rutler, Coincidentally: Unserious Reflections on Trivial Connections

Coincidentally: Unserious Reflections on Trivial Connections (video available, mp3)
Fr. George Rutler, Pastor, Church of Our Saviour, New York City, NY
ISI F. M. Kirby Campus
1/31/2008

Monday, October 19, 2009

IBMA 2009 - Dailey & Vincent

IBMA 2009 - Dailey & Vincent - I Believe


IBMA 2009 - Dailey & Vincent - By The Mark

Sierra Hull

Sierra Hull - Instrumental




Sierra Hull, From Now On, Greyfox Bluegrass Festival 2009


Sierra Hull & Sam Bush - Lonesome Fiddle Blues


Honey You Dont Know My Mind
Mike Whitney, The Dollar Will Not Crash
I was driving on 880 back to the room, when I saw a billboard: "Islam: The Message of Abraham, Moses, Jesus, and Muhammed. 1-877-Why Islam. www.whyislam.org"

The joys of living in a state that mandates diversity through its wrong-headed immigration policies. Now the Muslims are openly prostelytizing. Why shouldn't the United States be Christian? Who among the elites wanted to see the Christian character of the states destroyed?

On another note -- I drove back to the hometown tonight to meet with a potential tutoring client, but he flaked. Something to expect from Mainlanders? I did see his (martial arts) school. I really don't think he can afford tutoring for his children 4 times a week, 2 hours each session. Mum is suspicious of it all, and mad that he wasted our time. (I asked her to come to act as a translator, since he speaks only Mandarin.)
Certain contributors at WWWTW take on American Conservative and Daniel Larison: The American Conservative. At least Maximos does what he can to defend Dr. Larison.

A dissenting view on the Founding?

Is America Utopian? (mp3)
Historical Lecture
John Rao, Asso. Professor of History, St. John's University
12/1/1984

ISI lectures on the American founding

The Philadelphia MiracleNEW (mp3)
E. Christian Kopff, Associate Professor of Classics and Associate Director of the Honors Program, University of Colorado
Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, TX
3/14/2009
The Roots of America Order Seminar

America's Judeo-Christian HistoryNEW (mp3)
Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History, Hillsdale College
Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, TX
3/14/2009
The Roots of America Order Seminar


America's Greek and Roman RootsNEW (mp3)
Bruce S. Thornton, Professor of Classics and Humanities, California State University, Fresno
Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, TX
3/14/2009
The Roots of America Order Seminar


America's EnglishnessNEW (mp3)
Mark C. Henrie, Editor, The Intercollegiate Review
Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, TX
3/14/2009
The Roots of America Order Seminar
The World Turned Upside Down


Supposedly played by the British at their surrender at Yorktown.

The British Surrender at Yorktown, 1781


LIBERTY! . Chronicle of the Revolution . Yorktown 1781 | PBS


Not exactly the founding itself, but a key moment in the colonies achieving their independence, yes?

Sunday, October 18, 2009

Robert Moynihan on Grace Kelly: Letter #34, from Rome, Grace





Zenit: On World Mission Sunday and Pope's Address After Piano Concert.

From the latter:

This concert has, once again, permitted us to taste the beauty of music, a spiritual and therefore universal language, a vehicle so importantly suited to understanding and union between persons and peoples. Music is a part of all cultures and, we might say, accompanies every human experience, from pain to pleasure, from hatred to love, from sadness to joy, from death to life. We see how, over the course of the centuries and millennia, music has always been used to give a form to that which we are not able to speak in words, because it awakens emotions that are difficult to communicate otherwise. So it is not by chance that every civilization has placed such importance and value on music in its various forms and expressions.

Music, great music, gives the spirit repose, awakens profound sentiments and almost naturally invites us to lift up our mind and heart to God in every situation, whether joyous or sad, of human existence. Music can become prayer. Thanks again to those who organized this beautiful evening. Dear friends, I bless you all from the heart.



Pope Benedict XVI sits after arriving at the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican to attend a piano concert performed by Chinese pianist Jin Ju, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2009. (AP/Daylife)

Chinese pianist Jin Ju performs during a concert attended by Pope Benedict XVI, at the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2009. (AP/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI blesses faithful at the end of a piano concert performed by Chinese pianist Jin Ju at the Paul VI Hall at the Vatican, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2009. (AP/Daylife)
Zenit: DVD Marks Pius XII's Role in "Great Rescue"

The DVD -- Pius XII and the Holocaust.
Times Online: The red under David Cameron’s bed
Phillip Blond: The radical thinker who has bewitched the Tory high command with his ‘third way’ tells how he could make the Conservatives the party of the poor and mend broken Britain
Mom: "I told you to go find a teaching job in Hong Kong so you could find a Hong Kong girl."

haha

I said it would be hard to find a woman who wants to be a "SAHM" and homeschool. She said there are a lot of women who would want to stay home and be "siu si lai." She can look for one if she visits Hong Kong (and Macau) next week.

Went to SF today to celebrate yeh yeh's birthday today. Traffic was terrible on 19th Ave. The food, not so good. (The salt spicy fish fillet tasted like Fisherman's Wharf, and a lot of the salt spicy pork was overdone and tough.) Next time we should go to T-28.
The SC County Sheriff does have a SWAT Team: SERT. Are they called upon often?

ISI lectures on Röpke

Wilhelm Röpke: His Life and Times (video available, mp3)
John Zmirak
The Columbia Club, Indianapolis, IN
4/12/2008

Röpke's Humane Economics: Lessons for the European Union (video available, mp3)
Roger Scruton, British Author, Philosopher, and Columnist
The Columbia Club, Indianapolis, IN
4/12/2008


Röpke's Conundrum Over the Natural Family (video available, mp3)
Allan C. Carlson
The Columbia Club, Indianapolis, IN
4/12/2008


Röpke and the Search for the Common Good (video available, mp3)
Edward Hadas
The Columbia Club, Indianapolis, IN
4/12/2008

A few ISI lectures on economics

Third Ways: What Bulgarian Greens and Swedish Housewives Can Teach Us About the Financial CrisisNEW (video available, mp3)
Allan C. Carlson
University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana
4/16/2009


Building the Humane Economy in an Age of BailoutsNEW (video available, mp3)
Peter Koslowski
The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC
4/1/2009

Plus a debate:
Economic Freedom and Moral Virtue: Does the Free Market Produce Captive Souls?NEW (video available, mp3)
Doug Bandow, Former Senior Fellow, Cato Institute
David L. Schindler
Georgetown University, Washington, DC
4/1/2009

ISI lectures on education

What It Means to Be EducatedNEW (mp3)
Richard M. Gamble
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
6/6/2009


The Failure of American Public EducationNEW (mp3)
Bruce S. Thornton, Professor of Classics and Humanities, California State University, Fresno
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
6/6/2009


John Henry Newman and the Idea of a University
NEW (mp3)
Mark C. Henrie, Editor, The Intercollegiate Review
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
6/6/2009

Christopher Dawson and the Crisis of Western EducationNEW (mp3)
Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History, Hillsdale College
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
6/6/2009


Alternative Means of Education TodayNEW (mp3)
R. V. Young, Professor and Director of Graduate Programs in the Department of English at North Carolina State University
Rancho Santa Fe, CA
6/6/2009