Saturday, July 04, 2009

James Matthew Wilson, The Treasonous Clerk: Empire of Addiction, Part I and The Empire of Addiction, Part II

He refers to the second essay for its discussion of private property and how wide ownership can be implemented, without redistributivist schemes or the use of statist solutions.

I would like to read the arguments by Dr. Clyde Wilson (or by someone with whom he agrees) against protectionism and trade tarrifs and in favor of "free trade." I do not know if Dr. Clyde Wilson accepts the arguments put forth by the Austrian school or paleolibertarians, or if these differ from the arguments advanced by John C. Calhoun and others.
John Payne links to a series of posts on the topic of secession at Let a Thousand Nations Bloom in his Celebrate Secession!
The Treasonous Clerk: Letter to a Confused Catholic, by James Matthew Wilson


Christ’s revelation challenged this in several ways. He taught that in fact the end of human life was not merely obedience to God’s Law, but an immortal union with God in Heaven. The end, or purpose, of human life could not be reached in this world, but only begun in it. Our destiny lies beyond this world, in the contemplation of God in complete joy. How did one acquire the tools necessary to reach this destiny? Christ said the virtue of obedience to God—a good virtue to have—was not the one thing needful. One must also possess a spirit of humility that accepted the good things of this life but did not expect them—a spirit that even refused some good things if they did not lead directly to basking in the presence of God as Goodness Itself. One must possess also a disposition to mercy and forgiveness rather than pride and revenge; this was grounded on the recognition that all things are creatures of God and would not have been created were they not loved by Him, but also on the recognition that as creatures summoned from nothingness, we are all unworthy of that love and, insofar as we slight it, we commit sin, we show ourselves defective in gratitude for gifts we could not possibly deserve. Above all, one must be capable of living according to the love of God and of other persons, even to the point of sacrificing one’s own life in and for that love. Thus, the good life for man—the life that flourishes and reaches the greatest happiness—may result, in this world, not only in ordeals of apparent, or short-term, unhappiness and loss, but may indeed result in the loss of one’s earthly life in order to live more fully and happily the life everlasting.

Now, all ethical thinking results in one’s conceiving of a path from the incipient image of the good life to the attainment of the good life itself. But Christ’s gospel of love and union with God was so profound that it very quickly was recognized not merely as a way to a good life, but as the Way. The earliest Christians called themselves disciples of the Way. That does not mean that Christianity is reducible to an ethical system; it does mean however that all the truths about Himself that God reveals impact upon how a human person should live in this world (at the very least, knowing the Truth about God is one of the things we must, ethically, do; simply having bad or distorted knowledge in our heads may have consequences).


If there is a weakness with this account it is that it perhaps neglects discussing the necessity of grace in the discussion of the life to which all are called.

Some reading for the 4th of July

The Old Cause by Joseph R. Stromberg
John Taylor of Caroline (1753-1824), Federalism, and Empire
JEFFERSONIAN THEORIST PAR EXCELLENCE

An Inquiry Into the Principles and Policy of the Government of the United States by John Taylor
Anonymous writes in response to James Ostrowski and Reasons for not celebrating the 4th:
What an insane, bitter post. I'm loath to bring myself into this discussion but the audacity of the writer's suggestion demands a reply. With all due respect to the erudition of the writer, he seems to have more in common with the smug condescension of H.L. Mencken than with the founders or with average Americans who still strongly believe there is something worthwhile to celebrate on July Fourth.

I can easily imagine what hard-working, everyday Americans who are enjoying the day with their families and with veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan (not to mention WWII, Vietnam and Korea, etc.), would have to say if the idea were proposed that, on this day, there is nothing worth celebrating anymore. Scandalous.

Even popes have lauded America's singular contributions to the world. But you'll be hard pressed to find such praise reprinted on this gloomy blog. Has the US strayed from the original vision put forth by the founders? Yes. Have we lost sight of the ideals that inspired the Declaration of Independence? YES. But all the more reason to rededicate ourselves on this day to informing our fellow citizens about the beauty of what happened in 1776, rather than throw in the towel and mope in the corners of the blogosphere.

Here is one person who won't be returning to this blog, too depressing.


Here's another link: Uncelebrating the Fourth by Harry Browne. (It is perhaps filled with too much Americanism in its portrayal of American independence, but at least it has a better grasp of what has happened since then than, say, Rush Limbaugh or Sean Hannity. A similar criticism could be levelled at Mr. Ostrowski, but then again, he is a paleolibertarian.) I post again a link to Dr. Gutzman's Myths of the 4th of July.

Perhaps Anonymous has not been reading this blog very long. What is an average American? A Yankee? Someone who believes that the War to Prevent Southern Independence was a just war? Or that the United States is a single political entity, and not a federal union of sovereign states? Most Americans have no idea of what they are really celebrating, because they've accepted the Nationalist myth, and so they do not see how their current political system actually opposes what their forebears living in the thirteen original states wanted. How strange it is for someone to celebrate their rejection of a tyrant living an ocean away, and yet at the same time acquiesce in the usurpation of power by the Federal Government and think that this is proper. Such apparent cognitive dissonance can be explained only by great ignorance and unreflective habit.

Americans would be better off learning about the Constitution and the Tenth Amendment, and doing something to restore state sovereignty. Here's one suggestion: check out the Tenth Amendment Center. Or join the Campaign for Liberty. Does one celebrate his parents' wedding anniversary if they've had an acrimonious divorce? Probably not. The civic religion of the modern American nation-state has appropriated the 4th of July for its own ends. The communal observance of this day is like a habit, difficult to break. But in observing it, are we not pretending that what was achieved by the war for independence continues to exist, like a pretending that his divorced parents consider themselves to be still married? Instead, should we not be working for a restoration of the old constitutional order, refraining from celebrating until the task has been finished? We must acknowledge that something has been lost in order to recover it.

As for the veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, we should honor those who offer themselves in service to this country, but those two recent imperial misadventures should serve to remind us of the evils committed by the National Government, and how far it has strayed from what was intended by the Founding Fathers. What does the secession of the thirteen colonies from Great Britain have to do with wars overseas and the occupation of other countries? NOTHING. (This is the sort of emotionally-charged red herring that one would expect from someone who hasn't actually served in the armed forces, or a neo-con.) Moreover, talk of the "ideals" of the Declaration of Independence sounds like proposition nation propaganda to me. See Daniel Larison's Happy Independence Day!, and then read M.E. Bradford.

Regarding the popes and their praise -- that's a rather ultramontane thing to say. Are all of the popes equally educated about the American political order, as it was understood by those ratifying the Constitution? I think not. Perhaps much of the rhetoric does not rise above the level of flattery. Or, perhaps the pope are mistaken in matters that do not involve Church teaching on faith and morals!

The sooner one recognizes reality for what it is, the better off one will be. At least one is then able to pursue a true solution, rather than inadvertently promoting the status quo as a result of an erroneous understanding of what the problems are and through misguided efforts. (And it is certainly better than recommending that all one needs to do is "educate" one's self through "talk radio" and vote R.)

*Does this mean that we should not have bbqs or watch fireworks on the 4th of July? Probably not. But if such activities should be accompanied by the reminder that what is being celebrated has been destroyed by those consolidating Federal power, then how can one be festive or joyful? It is more of an occasion for lamentation and prayer. Abstaining from public endorsements of the status quo (such as parades) seems to be warranted, if we are going to be consistent. How can we reinforce the belief of others that everything is ok with the U.S. of A. when we know it to be otherwise?
Supposed to be fireworks at 9:30 tonight... maybe I'll take a walk then.

Reasons for not celebrating the 4th

Remarks to the WNY Tea Party on July 4th by James Ostrowski (via Rebellion)

Free and sovereign states declaring their independence from King George III? Where are they now?

The descendants of the Loyalists who left the colonies are not better off, and neither are the members of the Commonwealth. (Look at the UK and Canada.)

Early American music

The Music of Early America
Colonial Music Institute

Friday, July 03, 2009

Heavens Fall is based on a true story. What does the movie reveal about the South and Alabama? Could race relations have developed differently if it had not been for the Civil War and Reconstruction? (The question assumes that slavery would have ended eventually.)

"The Scottsboro Boys" Trials
Annus Sacerdotalis
Cecilia Bartoli - Ah non credea / Ah non giunge! (La Sonnambula)


Some dispute in the comments section to the video over Bartoli's rendition. Could she do this live? In a theater with good acoustics? Why not?
The bishop of Beijing increasingly prisoner of Patriotic Association
by Wang Zhicheng
The organization that controls the Church only allows him enough space to praise the Chinese Churches independence from the Holy See. The PA is trying to bring to obedience official bishops after the Pope's letter. Persecution of official and underground bishops.
I read this review of Confessions of a Dog. How much corruption is there in Japan--in the police, the justice system, and politics?

Confessions of a Dog trailer (with English subs)


【国内】警察権力の実態を描いた 映画「ポチの告白」(前半) 20090219
【国内】警察権力の実態を描いた 映画「ポチの告白」(後半) 20090219
北芝健x鈴木邦男x高橋玄トークロングバージョン


Toronto J-Film Pow-Wow: Gen Takahashi delivers a hard-hitting cop drama with "Confessions of a Dog"


ポチの告白
(ja wiki)
Grand Cafe Pictures: ポチの告白

高橋玄
ja wiki

通称、映画監督。 高橋玄

MouRa直言, 映画高橋玄「通称、映画監督。」



Someone at Twitch recommended this South Korean movie for its use of HD photography.

「誰も守ってくれない」


Feathers in the Wind (2005) - 깃 - Trailer
Patrick Deneen, Justice and Community

First we should ask – what is justice? Justice, according to the Aristotelian definition, is defined as giving each person his or her due – that is, “just desert.” In order to do that, the ancients recognized that it is necessary to know something of the character of each individual in order to treat each person justly. In order to have sufficient, much less intimate, knowledge of many individuals, it is necessary to live in relatively small settings where such knowledge is possible. Yet, in such intimate settings, we are likely not to need formal appeals to justice. Inasmuch as we are likely to know those with whom we share our lives, our relationships are much more likely to be based on appeals to “friendship” or love, not justice (imagine a family, or small community, or church, that operated on strict demands of justice, instead of charity). Aristotle wrote that where there is ample practice of friendship, there is no need of justice; further, that where there are greater degrees of friendship, there are fewer lawsuits (or need for laws) regulating our behavior. We are more likely to deal informally with our fellow citizens, including the ability to forbear injury and to accept conditions of inequality if the underlying condition informing that inequality is a shared regard for the common good.


I don't know if this really follows from an Aristotelian understanding of particular justice. We may not be as strict in respecting a return from friends, and be more liberal; but is there a need for courts to pursue lawsuits when necessary? Or are there other institutions to which citizens would turn in Athens?

Equality is, in certain senses, the opposite of justice: it rewards like and unlike equally. Its precondition is that I know nothing about you, and even that I don’t particularly care about you. Its precondition is indifference, other than a formal demand not to be treated differently than anyone else. This latter definition of justice animates the philosophy of modern liberalism, particularly theories of justice inspired by John Rawls.


It is not just the opposite of justice, but unjust. Is justice reducible to distributive justice? And do all matters involving the relations between people fall under distributive justice? It is possible that some may have acquired wealth through unjust means, claiming rights that do not exist (especially with regards to property and goods that should be common -- land and other natural resources). But is the solution to redistribute secondary goods or money? Or to redistribute primary goods as much as possible, so that all have the same access to them?


(source)

John Rawls:
SEP
IEP
A Theory of Justice by John Rawls
History of Economic Thought
David B. Richardson
John Rawls on Justice
"Punishment"
Thomas Fleming, Credo for Conservatives Part III: Order, Tradition, and Loyalty

C To undermine such loyalty–as has been done by every movement of illuminists, liberals, libertarians, Jacobins, Marxists, multi-culturalists, prohibitionists (the list is endless)–is inherently wrong, even where a regime or ruler is manifestly corrupt and oppressive. We are, naturally, justified in defending the interests of kin and friends and co-religionists and in trying to change bad laws and policies, but the revolutionary overthrow of a regime can only be justified in extreme cases, e.g., where the regime requires us to participate in what we–note the significant use of the first person plural, not singular–we have always regarded to be evil. If Pharoah or Herod orders the murder of our children, we cannot comply and may indeed have to take up arms to resist. If Pharoah wants to let other people kill their children, that is an entirely different story.
He only gives one example of an extreme case here; possibly Dr. Fleming would agree that it is right to resist a tyrant, if there is no other way of protecting the common good.

He does not say if the draft is licit or just, but he talks of our duty to defend the country and our obligation to do so if called upon: "
We cannot simultaneously be protected by the American army and refuse to serve, if drafted."

The government has not lost its legitimacy, even if it has failed to protect (even deliberately subverted) the original constitutional order--he writes in New Haven’s Poor Little Lambs:

As I said in the beginning, what happens in New Haven is of small concern to us outsiders. If Connecticut had a decent constitution, it would be of no significance to the people of Hartford, and if the Constitution of the United States were still in force, the case would never have reached the Federal courts. If the people of New Haven wish to commit suicide, they are welcome to do it—at least it would eliminate the Yale faculty.

But, under the current misrepresentation of the Constitution, the federal courts do have a say in a strictly local matter. No one on the Court denies it, even Justice Ginsburg, whose intellectual and moral confusion reached undreamed of heights of folly and stupidity in her dissent. On the one hand, it is a local matter of concern to New Haven. On the other, the white firefighters have no right to the promotion that they worked for and deserve according to the rules by which they were hired, and on her third hand—the Justice is manifestly a freak of nature—it is the duty of the courts to promote a manifestly incompetent group at the expense of the more competent and of the entire city.

The best that can be said of the majority’s decision is that it affirms a long-standing Western and American commitment to standards of excellence. Unfortunately, in taking up the case, the Court has inevitably confirmed the activist tendencies of the past 50 years and once again overridden the federal principle. In conceding that the justices had no choice in the matter, I am only admitting that a) the Constitution is a dead issue, and b) federalism is extinct. The response of New Haven’s government, the national press, an the Democratic Party is also a sign of something, which is that America is simply New Haven writ large, a congeries of hostile ethnic groups ruled by an autocratic elite whose minds have been poisoned by the liberal education that is simply the education of liberals.

He later adds:

When there is a case of injustice, as there was in New Haven, we are justified in saying–as I did say–that on balance the right side won without pretending that it is a victory for the nation or for truth, justice, and the American Way. As for the question of jurisdiction, I also explained why even justices who might know better were compelled to rule. But people who say “there is no way back” are conceding my most dismal point. Because, if states and local communities cannot regain power over their affairs, then nothing the Supreme Court will do can possibly arrest the steady decline.

Is there any point to celebrating the 4th of July, when we have lost our understanding of what that event really is? 13 colonies declaring their independence, rather than the birth of a new nation or some other revisionism?

I don't know why Dr. Fleming is somewhat dismissive of Dr. Gutzman. Perhaps Dr. Fleming is growing more irritable with age. (Unless he reckons that he hasn't produced enough scholarly works, writing instead for a popular audience.) Let us pray for him...

Forrest McDonald: Online Library of Liberty. See his “Was the Fourteenth Amendment Constitutionally Adopted?” Georgia Journal of Southern Legal History (Spring/Summer 1991).

King

king
O.E. cyning, from P.Gmc. *kuninggaz (cf. Du. koning, O.H.G. kuning, O.N. konungr, Dan. konge, Ger. könig). Possibly related to O.E. cynn "family, race" (see kin), making a king originally a "leader of the people;" or from a related root suggesting "noble birth," making a king originally "one who descended from noble birth." The sociological and ideological implications make this a topic of much debate. Finnish kuningas "king," O.C.S. kunegu "prince" (Rus. knyaz, Boh. knez), Lith. kunigas "clergyman" are loans from Gmc. In O.E., used for names of chiefs of Anglian and Saxon tribes or clans, then of the states they founded. Also extended to British and Danish chiefs they fought. The chess piece so called from 1411; the playing card from 1563; use in checkers/draughts first recorded 1820. Applied in nature to species deemed remarkably big or dominant (e.g. king crab, 1698),
Pioneer Farm Equipment!

Two on the Amish

Economy takes its toll on Amish (via EB)
Will Higgins and Tim Evans, USA TODAY

What the Amish have to teach us about Transition
Carolyn Baker, Speaking Truth to Power

The Amish ran privately-owned family farms for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when they began taking jobs off the farm where they made good money, but many also became seduced by consumerism. They gradually spent more money, allowed themselves some of the conveniences previously shunned in order to live more simply, and found themselves caught up in spending more money and buying things they didn't need ... One Amish man comments on the need to return to basics: "We were all going way too fast. This has made everybody stop and realize we're just pilgrims here..."

Thursday, July 02, 2009

Debt, Oil and Healthcare Reform
Dan Bednarz, PhD, Health after Oil

...the ongoing healthcare debate in Washington is anachronistic. A future oriented analysis has to include two driving forces: first, the long-term consequences of the fiscal/economic crisis and, second, the arrival of geological peak oil...

Zenit: On Priestly Identity

"One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone" [2009-07-01]

The Archdruid Report: Where Economics Fails

Another set of factors that can crumple up the law of supply and demand and toss it into the wastebasket, though, has received far less attention. These are constraints that we might as well call “ecological,” and they unfold from the awkward fact that human economic activity is far less independent of the natural world than economists often try to pretend. The scale of this dependence is as rarely recognized as it is hard to overstate. One of the few attempts to quantify it, an attempt to work out the replacement costs for natural services carried out a few years back by a team headed by heretical economist Robert Costanza, came up with a midrange figure equal to around three times the gross domestic product of all human economic activity on earth.

Out of every dollar of value circulating in the world’s economy, in other words, something like 75 cents were provided by natural processes rather than human labor. What’s more, most if not all of that 75 cents of value had to be there in advance in order for the production of the other 25 cents to be possible at all. Before you can begin farming, for example, you need to have arable soil, water, and an adequate growing season, as well as more specialized natural services such as pollination. These are nonnegotiable requirements; if you don’t have them, you can’t farm. The same is true of every other kind of productive work in the human economy: nature’s contribution comes first, and generally determines how much the human economy can produce.

It’s for this reason that E.F. Schumacher, the maverick economist whose ideas are the launching pad for this series of posts, drew a hard distinction between what he called primary goods and secondary goods. Secondary goods are the goods and services provided by human labor, the ordinary subject of economic theory. Primary goods are the goods and services provided by nature, and they make the production of secondary goods possible. The difference between the two is very much like the difference between income and profit in a business: you have to have income in order to have profit, and if you neglect income while maximizing your profit, sooner or later you go bust.

A failure to distinguish between primary and secondary goods is at the root of a great deal of current economic nonsense. It’s usually possible, for example, to substitute one secondary good for another if the supply runs short or the price gets too high, and for this reason it’s a standard assumption of economics – and one of the foundations of the law of supply and demand – that consumers can meet their needs equally well with many different goods. Yet this assumption does not apply to natural goods. In the world of nature, a different rule – Liebig’s law of the minimum – applies instead: production is limited by the scarcest necessary resource. Thus if you have a farm and can’t get water for your crops, it doesn’t matter if you have excellent soil and all the other requisites of farming; you can’t grow anything.
Domenico Sodano dirige l'Ensemble vocale "L. Roncalli" - "Ave Maris Stella" (G. P. da Palestrina)


Domenico Sodano dirige l'Ensamble L. Roncalli -"Sicut cervus" di G. P. da Palestrina


Domenico Sodano dirige l'Ensemble vocale "L.Roncalli"-O Bone Jesu di G. P. da Palestrina


Domenico Sodano

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Freddy Gray, Cricket in America

Australian batsman Ricky Ponting (L) faces a ball from England Lions bowler Steve Harmison during the friendly international cricket match at New Road in Worcester, central England on July 1, 2009. Australia begin their Ashes tour against England in Cardiff on July 8. (Getty/Daylife)

Australia's Brett Lee (L) hits the ball against England Lions during the friendly international cricket match at New Road in Worcester, central England on July 1, 2009. Australia begin their Ashes tour against England at Cardiff on July 8. (Getty/Daylife)

I remember the New Scot saying he couldn't understand the rules for Cricket. Here in the South Bay you may see South Asians playing it at public parks or school yards--for example, the park next to Cupertino Public Library, or the yard behind Wilson High School, off Homestead Ave.

I'd like to learn how to play the game; I'm also a bit of an Anglophile, more so than some of my friends.

Links:
wiki
An Explanation of Cricket
Cricket Laws -- Rules
Rules of Twenty 20 Cricket

Cricket News
International Cricket Council
England and Wales Cricket Board
Cricket Australia
New Zealand Cricket
Cricket Nirvana
Hong Kong Cricket Festival
Cricket Sixes HK

World Cricket Store
Cricket equipment - Cricket Direct
Fr. Z: Interview with dom Cassian Folsom, OSB, on Extraordinary Use and Norcia, Italy: Monastery of S. Benedetto to celebrate Mass in both Uses

The Monastery of San Benedetto, Norcia, Italy

Stefano Zamagni

Google Books: An outline of the history of economic thought

Apparently Stefano Zamagni will be present for the official presentation of the Holy Father's next encyclical, "Caritas in veritate."


UN Authors: Stefeno Zamagni
University of Bologna
John Hopkins faculty page

To get beyond the economic crisis: The Economy of Communion celebrates 18 years
Conference given by Stefano Zamagni

Stefano Zamagni | in Liquida

Principles of Economics




THE GREAT AMERICAN BUBBLE MACHINE, by Matt Taibbi

From tech stocks to high gas prices, Goldman Sachs has engineered every major market manipulation since the Great Depression - and they're about to do it again

pdf (hosted at scribd)

Did Credit Default Swaps Cause the Financial Market Meltdown? by Stephan Teak


The Thirteenth, Greatest of Centuries by James J. Walsh, M.D., PH.D., LL.D.
Fr. Z: Request for a novena of prayer for the healing of a monk

Prayers are requested for Father Francois de Feydeau, Subprior of Our Lady of the Annunciation (aka Clear Creek) Monastery. (I believe he has been diagnosed with brain cancer?)

June 30-July 8, 2009

Almighty and eternal God,

Humbly and with confidence, we implore from Thy goodness the cure of our brother, who is gravely ill. Deign to bestow this miracle upon him, through the intercession of Thy servant, Dom Prosper Gueranger, for Thine own glory, for the advancement of his cause of beatification, for the sanctification of our monasteries, and for the good of the entire Church.

Through Our Lord, Jesus Christ, Thy Son, Who lives and reigns with Thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. Amen.

O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.

Saint John Marie Vianney, pray for us.

Our Blessed Father, Saint Benedict, pray for us.

Saint Francis of Assisi, pray for us.


Dom François de Feydeau
Peter Hitchens: On not wanting to know about Michael Jackson
FUNERAL Y BIOGRAFIA DEL PADRE MARCIAL MACIEL L.C.


Documental padre marcial maciel


You can still find some tribute videos to the founder of the Legionaries at Youtube. Many of them are in Spanish. Is denial greater in Mexico than in the United States?
Daniel McCarthy, Front Porch Empire

A friend asked me whether I’d comment on the clash between James Poulos and his “Postmodern Conservatives” and the localists at the Front Porch Republic. I replied that Patrick Deneen had already made the point that I would have made: “PoMoCons are uneasily but pretty firmly aligned with the Republican party as it has been forged in modern times by the likes of Reagan and Bush. FPR’ers are generally pretty discontent with the whole crew, Dem and Rep alike … ”

I’m closer to the Front Porchers, for their decentralism and because they make the more penetrating critique of state and society, though if I had to choose a neoteric faction to align with I’d go with the “left-conservatives,” since I would take Dwight Macdonald or Gore Vidal over Wendell Berry. The greatest doubt I harbor about the Front Porchers is whether local communities (as if they can all be described at once) are as really virtuous as the Front Porch Republicans wish them to be. Most of the evils of the world exist on the local level, too — they’re just proportionally smaller. That’s good, but it’s not a panacea.

EWTN:

EPISCOPAL ORDINATION OF ARCHBISHOP-DESIGNATE AUGUSTINE DINOIA, OP- LIVE (2 1/2 hrs)
Live from the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, His Eminence, William Cardinal Levada, Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith presides over the Episcopal Ordination of Archbishop-Designate Augustine DiNoia, OP the newly named Secretary of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments.
Sat 7/11/09 2:00 PM ET / 11 AM PT
Sun 7/12/09 12:00 AM ET / (Sat) 9 PM PT
American Papist: Breaking: Abp. Chaput, other Legion visitors appointed by Vatican (full details added)

Youtube channels: LoC, RC

ENG | Live Your Mission - Legionaries of Christ



Carmen Aristegui Caso Marcial Maciel Documental Voto De Silencio 1 2


Carmen Aristegui Marcial Maciel - 1 Parte


Carmen Aristegui Marcial Maciel 2 Parte


Carmen Aristegui Marcial Maciel - 3 Parte
Michael Novak, again: What, Another Marxist Predicts the Collapse of Capitalism?
Sometimes it's hard to tell the vegetables from the flowers
Gene Logsdon, Dave Smith, Organic To Be

Our potatoes are growing this year better than ever. Everything is growing better this year, after two years that would try any gardener’s soul. When the potato plants started blooming a couple of weeks ago, I was pleasantly surprised to see the patch turn into something of a flower garden.

(original)
Commentary: Interview with Charles T. Maxwell (Part 2 of 2)
Steve Andrews, ASPO-USA

"We’re not going to have to help the oil industry. They already have all the help they need. I wouldn’t take away what they have but I wouldn’t add to it."(Charlie Maxwell is the life-long oil industry analyst viewed by Barrons’ magazine as their energy guru.)

(original)
P. Herreweghe & Collegium Vocale Gent - Live @ The V. Sessions - June 11, 2009

Compressed video excerpt from Herreweghe's live session @ The V. Sessions
Cristobal de Morales - Emendemus in melius
Recorded on June 11th, 2009, Paris.
Complete session available on demand at http://theVsessions.com


Collegium Vocale Gent
Zenit: On the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul
"Resist Being Conformed to the Mentality of This World" [2009-06-30]
Recordings from the CMAA Sacred Music Colloquium XIX, June 2009. (via NLM)
Ad for Lahner Tactical.


United States Shooting Academy ad

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

St. Dominic's is looking for a DRE. Makes me think I should have gotten a theology degree for its practical uses.
Videos for the Mass of Installation of Bishop Salvatore Cordileone.
Tommy Carruthers New Video & Interview in his school in Glasgow from How Bruce Lee Changed the World


Complete Tommy Carruthers Demo



STAGE / SEMINARIO TOMMY CARRUTHERS JEET KUNE DO ITALIA 16 / 17 MAGGIO 2009 - May 16th and 17th 2009


Tommy Caruthers
Westminster Cathedral Choir - Psalms


I'd prefer this to the normal psalm-singing in English at seminaries and cathedrals here in the U.S.

Westminster Cathedral Choir - Sicut cervus desiderat


Tui sunt coeli


Westminster Cathedral Choir Concert, performing in the Cathedral of St Paul in St Paul, Minnesota


Westminster Cathedral Choir - O Domine


O sacrum convivium
USCCB: Year for Priests

The webpage features this icon, done by iconographer Marek Czarnecki of Serphapic Restorations, Meriden, Connecticut:


To the sides of Christ are Melchizedek and St. John Vianney.

I don't think I've seen an Eastern icon featuring Christ as (Eternal) High Priest depicted in this way. Compare with the traditional Eastern icon of Christ the High Priest:

(source)


(source)


(source)

Christ is both King and Priest in this icon. I do not know what vestments He is wearing. Czarnecki's icon depicts Christ in a Latin (Gothic) chasuble.
AsiaNews: Pope: no salvation for humanity without the healing of souls
On the feast of Saints Peter and Paul, Benedict XVI imposes the pallium on 34 archbishops, three of whom are from Asia. Beyond thinking and talking, we need the experience of faith, of the vital relationship with Jesus Christ. Faith must not remain theory: it must be life. Obedience to the truth.
AsiaNews: SOUTH KOREA
The 5,000th Korean priest is born in Seoul
by Theresa Kim Hwa-young
Card Nicholas Chung Jin-suk presided over the ordination ceremony for 27 priests and deacons. The prelate remembers the first Korean priest ordained 164 years ago who died a martyr’s death. The number of South Korean Catholics tops five million or about 10 per cent of the population.
William Lind, McChrystal’s Mission

(Also posted at DNI: On War #309: Going Nowhere Fast)
There was a brief power outage in this neighborhood tonight--it lasted about 2 hours. I don't know what caused it, but PG&E fixed it rather quickly. A good reminder that I should get some emergency supplies ready... is your emergency kit ready?

ReadyNation
WIRED: The Smarter Emergency Kit
Red Cross Emergency Supplies Kit (Red Cross Store)


Todd Jarrett on pistol shooting.


A lot of emphasis on sighted shooting?

Blackhawk Tips with Todd Jarrett: Shooting on the Move


Blackhawk Tips with Todd Jarrett: Tactical Reloads


website

Litany of the Saints



alt

Monday, June 29, 2009

Metropolitan Jonah @ ACNA


(via Byzantine, Texas)

The Common Cause Partnership
The editors of The University Bookman review Beyond Capitalism and Socialism: A New Statement of an Old Idea.
The arguments for agrarianism are not without rebuttals. While respect for and defense of rural life is crucial for societal health, it is clearly not the only model of society. Catholic thought does not, contrary to some of the claims in this collection, privilege rural life
Nor does it privilege what Jeremy Beer calls "meritocracy."
Christianity, after all, was spread first in the cities.
(1) Were the cities separated from the farms that supported them? No. And just because the Apostles chose to preach in the cities does not mean that whatever bears the name of "city" is acceptable to Catholics. Some cities are better than others. Just because one is an agrarian does not mean that one believes that people should be living on farms, separated from one another by some distance. (And even the Amish, who do live separated from one another, as opposed to living in hamlets or farming villages, nonetheless maintain close communal ties with one another.)
Nor does agrarianism appear fully sensitive to the notion of vocation: if a young man or woman feels called by God and talent to neuroscience rather than husbandry, there should be little obstacle to pursue that career ethically. To do so, obviously, requires a larger economic (and non-agrarian) infrastructure. What this important collection does, however, is bring back into public conversation the truths lost in a whirl of consumerism, imported goods (made under conditions we would rather not think about), and the true conditions of the good society.
Agrarianism has been mostly been a part of political theorizing, not theology. A friend thinks that the virtue of prudence has been very much neglected by contemporary spiritual writers (and amateur theologians) in their discussion of vocation, as if for most people God issues a call that is fully detailed. What the agrarians remind us is that the science of politics is very important for the building a healthy social order. A disordered political economy may lead to distortions in our perception of what we should be doing. As lay people, our vocation must be subjected to examination in light of one's duties, even if one's duty to God overrules the rest.

Should individual judgment be the ultimate arbiter as to whether one has a true vocation or not? Or should there be some sort of mediation by a community, or *gasp* a guild? Vocations to the priesthood are tested, just as vocations to religious life are. Why shouldn't lay vocations be tested by those who have some competency to determine whether one has the appropriate skills and moral character to be admitted to their profession?

I suppose part of a standard book review includes some notes about weaknesses of the book in addition to its strengths, but this critique just seems perfunctory and readily disposable, rather than anything substantial. I suppose it serves to underscore the problems of books, their wide publication, and the "industry" that depends upon them. Let us recall Plato's criticisms of books. Does a dependence upon books enhance or hinder memory? Should we expect books to be as thorough as a teacher?

Which reminds me, there are some books from IHS press that I need to remember to buy.

See also Marshall McLuhan: Postmodern Grammarian.

I like the icon used for the logo for the next Dominican General Chapter (2010). Is it available for purchase somewhere? (Or is there a larger version of it online?)

Edit. Br. Lawrence, O.P. has posted a photo of the icon online. The icon is to be found at Santa Sabina in Rome.

www.op.org now forwards to this address: curia.op.org.

Toulouse Province. Le Revue Thomiste. University of Fribourg, Theology Faculty.
The Philosopher might find this interesting, if he were ever to return to Chicago: Early Music Chicago.

The Tudor Choir



website

Cornysh rehearsal

Tallis Scholars Summer Schools
Early Music America
Ars Antiqua - Sancta Maria
Michael Novak, Economic Heresies of the Left

What exactly is in Benedict XVI’s new encyclical on the economy and labor issues is not yet known. Catholic leftists and progressives, though, are already trembling with excitement. Three glaring errors have already appeared in these heavily panting anticipations.

An accurate presentation of real existing capitalism requires at least three modest affirmations:

1) Markets work well only within a system of law, and only according to well-marked-out rules of the game; unregulated markets are a figment of imagination.

2) In actual capitalist practice, the love of creativity, invention, and groundbreaking enterprise are far more powerful than motives of greed.


3) The fundamental systemic motive infusing the spirit of capitalism is the imperative to liberate the world’s poor from the premodern ubiquity of grinding poverty. This motive lay at the heart of Adam Smith’s important victory over Thomas Malthus concerning the coming affluence—rather than starvation—of the poor.

Since the origins of modern capitalism around 1780, more than two-thirds of the world’s population has moved out of poverty. In China and India alone, more than 500 million have been raised out of poverty just in the last forty years. In almost every nation the average age of mortality has risen dramatically, causing populations to expand accordingly. Health in almost every dimension has been improved, and literacy has been carried to remote places it never reached before.


If the Holy Father does not offer anything more than "prudential advice" along with a re-statement of very general statements, I can see the First Things crowd appropriating the encyclical as their own.
Kevin Gutzman, When Tom Met Sally

How many slave women did Thomas Jefferson have relations with, according to the claims? Just one, according to wiki. Did she ever tell the children who their father was?

Is it because of "white supremacy" that this story is rejected? Or because we like to think of our heroes as moral paragons?

Photos: FSSPX Ordinations - Ecône

Will you ever see the secular media speak of "breakaway Catholic sect" when it covers attempted ordinations of women and such? The captions here are laughable.


Clerics prepare an ordination ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (AP/Daylife)

Nuns take part in an ordination ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (AP/Daylife)

Priests hold confessionals during an ordination ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)


Priests walk to the ordination mass of the breakaway Roman Catholic sect the Society of St Pius X in Econe, western of Switzerland. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)


Priests and deacons walk to the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics.

Bishop Bernard Fellay, center, greets worshippers as he arrives for an ordination mass of the breakaway Roman Catholic sect, the Society of St Pius X, in Econe, western Switzerland, Monday, June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and ten deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared 'illegitimate' by the Catholic church. The ordinations comes five months after the Pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (AP/Daylife)

A procession arrives for an ordination ceremony for priests in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)




Bishop Bernard Fellay (R) arrives for an ordination ceremony for priests in Econe, southwest Switzerland, June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

Bishop Bernard Fellay addresses the crowd before an ordination ceremony for priests in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)


Bishop Bernard Fellay of Switzerland delivers his sermon during the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)

Priests and deacons participate in an ordination mass of the breakaway Roman Catholic sect the Society of St Pius X in Econe, western of Switzerland. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)

New priests prostrate themselves as they receive benediction from Bishop Bernard Fellay (Background 2-R) during the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)

A new priest receive insignia from Bishop Bernard Fellay of Switzerland during the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)



Bishop Bernard Fellay ordinates a priest during a ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

New priests receive benediction from Bishops Bernard Tissier de Mallerais (2-L) of France and Alfonso de Galarreta of Spain (2-R) during the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics.


New priests receive benediction during the ordination mass of the breakaway Roman Catholic sect the Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared "illegitimate" by the Catholic church. The ordinations come five months after the pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (Getty/Daylife)

Monsignor Bernard Fellay, center, blesses a person during an ordination mass of the breakaway Roman Catholic sect, the Society of St Pius X, in Econe, western Switzerland, on Monday, June 29, 2009. Eight fundamentalist priests and 10 deacons have been inducted by the society based in Econe in a ceremony already declared 'illegitimate' by the Catholic church. The ordinations comes five months after the Pope lifted the excommunication of four of the society's bishops, including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, infuriating Jews and many Catholics. (AP/Daylife)

Bishop Bernard Tissier de Mallerais of France stands during an ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Breakaway fundamentalist Roman Catholics ordained eight priests at their seminary in the Swiss village of Econe, in renewed defiance of a ban by the Vatican. The ceremony by the Society of St Pius X, which was declared "illegitimate" by the Church, marked a second snub for Pope Benedict XVI's authority after four other ordinations over the weekend in Germany. In January the pope had lifted the excommunication of four of the society's "bishops", including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, in a gesture of reconciliation. (Getty/Daylife)


Bishop Bernard Fellay meets the faithful after an ordination ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland, June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)


New priests gather for a picture under a statue of former Pope Pius X after they have been ordained during a mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Breakaway fundamentalist Roman Catholics ordained eight priests at their seminary in the Swiss village of Econe, in renewed defiance of a ban by the Vatican. The ceremony by the Society of St Pius X, which was declared "illegitimate" by the Church, marked a second snub for Pope Benedict XVI's authority after four other ordinations over the weekend in Germany. In January the pope had lifted the excommunication of four of the society's "bishops", including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, in a gesture of reconciliation. (Getty/Daylife)


New priests and deacons pose for a picture after the ordination mass of the breakaway Traditionalist Catholic Roman Society of St Pius X in Econe, western Switzerland on June 29, 2009. Breakaway fundamentalist Roman Catholics ordained eight priests at their seminary in the Swiss village of Econe, in renewed defiance of a ban by the Vatican. The ceremony by the Society of St Pius X, which was declared "illegitimate" by the Church, marked a second snub for Pope Benedict XVI's authority after four other ordinations over the weekend in Germany. In January the pope had lifted the excommunication of four of the society's "bishops", including Holocaust denier Richard Williamson, in a gesture of reconciliation. (Getty/Daylife)


Bishop Bernard Fellay, center, poses with priests after an ordination ceremony in Econe, southwest Switzerland, June 29, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with the Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (AP/Daylife)


Fr. Z: A mystery bishop in attendance? Help from readers?

From 13 June 2009: Press Release regarding the Priestly Ordinations

Photos: FSSPX Ordinations - Germany

Why are the FSSPX ordinations getting media coverage now?


A man confesses his sins to a priest before an ordination ceremony to the priesthood of the Society of Saint Pius X in Zaitzkofen near Regensburg, southern Germany, June 27, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

Nuns pray during an ordination ceremony to the priesthood of the Society of Saint Pius X in Zaitzkofen near Regensburg, southern Germany, June 27, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

A bishop (standing, C) prays during an ordination ceremoney to the priesthood of the Society of Saint Pius X in Zaitzkofen near Regensburg, southern Germany, June 27, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

Newly ordained priests Lukasz Sydlowski from Poland (L-R), Thomas Suter from Switzerland and Hakan Erik Lindstroem from Sweden pray during the ordination ceremony to the priesthood of the Society of Saint Pius X in Zaitzkofen near Regensburg, southern Germany, June 27, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)

Society of Saint Pius X poses for the media after the ordination to the priesthood in Zaitzkofen near Regensburg, southern Germany, June 27, 2009. Earlier this year, Pope Benedict XVI lifted the excommunication of the four Bishops of the SSPX (Society of St. Pius X) leading to a possible reconciliation with Vatican. Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, founder of the traditionalist Catholic organization SSPX, had consecrated the four bishops against Pope John Paul II's will, automatically leading to excommunication in 1988. (Reuters/Daylife)