Saturday, May 10, 2008

Space Battleship Yamato




Found a bunch of vids of SBY and Star Blazers at YT... I think all 3 series are available online...

Symphony Space Battleship Yamato:
part 1 - part 2 - part 3 - part 4

The New Journey: part 1 (of 9)
Be Forever Yamato: part 1 (of 14)
Final Yamato: part 1 (of 15); ending; alternate ending (I don't think it was used for the theatrical release, was it? It was probably a bit too risque.)

wiki
Starship Schematic Database - Space Battleship Yamato

Info about the recent OAV series that was never completed: Space Battleship Yamato

I saw only the 1st and 2nd seasons--I'm not sure if the 3rd season was shown in the U.S., but I believe it is now available on DVD. Albert H. in my 5th grade class both watched the show; the only day I couldn't watch it was Tuesday, because of CCD, though I was able to catch a couple of minutes on a TV in one of the classrooms at St. Joe's because the helper for my sister's class was also a fan. Albert would draw pictures of the various earth vessels, including one of the Yamato (aka Argo).

Americans might be surprised by the realistic depiction of violence and death in a "cartoon" from the late 70s. (Iirc, much of this was toned down when the series was introduced as Star Blazers in the U.S., and the deaths of several characters were eliminated.) This is a staple of Japanese animation, in contrast to American cartoons on networks TV which have to be children-friendly, regardless of the age of the intended audience. In Japan accomodations are made in accordance with what older children can be exposed to. (In contrast, in the cartoon version of G.I. Joe, no one ever died, even though the G.I. Joe team was fighting against the "terrorist" organization COBRA.) Is there any Japanese series which has more heroic deaths than Space Battleship Yamato? (Of course, the deaths are mostly of "minor" characters, but there are a few major characters who sacrifice their lives for others, or die doing their duty, as well.)

Does the depiction of violence in AV media have a harmful impact on children? One might argue that there is a difference between receiving a story and active engagement in the representation of violence. Death is given a moral context in anime like Space Battleship Yamato (even if deemed simplistic by sophisticated academics), not like in certain first-person shooters or games like Grand Theft Auto IV, in which players are encouraged to be immoral. One plays the "good guy" in a game like Ghost Recon, Rainbow 6, Halo, or Call of Duty, so some morality is presupposed, but it could be easily ignored by gamers who are only interested in entertainment. Might it be that it is worse when people play against each other, head-to-head? Or is there no difference between the two situations with respect to moral formation, as game-playing itself conditions the child to easily shoot a gun at another human being? I am persuaded by Dave Grossman that such video games can have such a psychological effect on children, and I think he does make allowances for the moral framework of the game, but I'll have to reread what he has written on the subject.
Immaculate Mary

Immaculate Mary, your praises we sing;
You reign now in splendor with Jesus our King.
Ave, ave, ave, Maria! Ave, ave, Maria!

In heaven, the blessed your glory proclaim;
On earth we, your children, invoke your sweet name.
Ave, ave, ave, Maria! Ave, ave, Maria!

We pray for the Church, our true Mother on earth,
And beg you to watch o'er the land of our birth.
Ave, ave, ave, Maria! Ave, ave, Maria!

source

I think this is the hymn my mother taught to niece #2, but she mistakenly thought it was Immaculate Mother instead of Immaculate Mary? I'll have to ask her. Niece #1 knows the first verse, and niece #2 knows when to start singing "Ave" though she pronounces it "Awi."

Edit: My mother changed the word on purpose, because she thought it would be nicer, and to emphasize to niece #1 that the Blessed Mother is the Mother of us all.

Lee Ann Womack MVs

Alan Jackson & Lee Ann Womack' Golden Ring


Lee Ann Womack-2005 Fanfest-I May Hate Myself in the Morning


MV

Lee Ann Womack - Finding My Way Back Home

Lee Ann Womack - I Hope You Dance

Lee Ann Womack - Ashes By Now

Lee Ann Womack - Something Worth Leaving Behind

Lee Ann Womack - Twenty Years And Two Husbands Ago









official site
CMT.com : Lee Ann Womack : Artist Main; photos
Lee Ann Womack Photos on Yahoo! Music
Lee Ann Womack Photo Gallery : Rolling Stone

3 More from First Principles

Education and the Individual
Richard M. Weaver (IR 2:1, September 1965) - 05/09/08

How to Read the Declaration: Reconsidering the Kendall Thesis
M. E. Bradford (IR 28:1, Fall 1992) - 05/08/08

Leo Strauss, George Grant, and Historicism
Gregory S. Butler (IR 31:1, Fall 1995) - 05/07/08

Hrm, so George Grant is a "Straussian"--interesting.

In conclusion, Grant holds on to the possibility that a rejection of modernity may take place in the very historical act of living in it and through it. Unlike doctrinaire followers of Straussian orthodoxy, Grant holds out the possibility of loving the very darkness of modernity, because it may very well be the means by which divine Providence itself is working to cast a light back on the truth of the past. For this reason his writings do not rely heavily on a rationalist appeal through dialectics; they involve an almost obsessive probing of the tragedy and darkness of the modern “cave.” As a Christian, Grant is able to see in the mysterious, unplanned workings of history a revelatory force capable of drawing man back into God, a force that (ironically) becomes present at the moment when modernity has reached its apex.
If this is an accurate representation of Grant's thought, then I think it's an overly optimistic understanding of modernity and its relationship to God (if we accept that there is such a phenomena as modernity, which is somehow different from the sinfulness of man).

wiki
George Parkin Grant

Joseph Stromberg reviews Restoring the Meaning of Conservatism

The Form Regained: A Review of Restoring the Meaning of Conservatism: Writings from Modern Age, edited by George A. Panichas (Wilmington, DE: ISI Books, 2008) 350 pages, $28.00.

Ronald Knox Society

website

It is offering a CD OF 4 RONALD KNOX RADIO BROADCASTS,$10 POSTPAID. I would like to hear his actual voice.

From the comments section for this NLM post.

Related Links:

Ronald Knox - CatholicAuthors.com
Monsignor Ronald Knox | IgnatiusInsight.com Author Page
Theotokos Mgsr. Ronald Knox page - www.theotokos.org.uk
Ronald Knox's Conversion Story
Insight Scoop | The Ignatius Press Blog: Ronald Knox, Apologist
dogma the belief of catholics ronald knox
The Belief of Catholics - Google Books Result
Knox's Translation of the Vulgate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pastoral and Occasional Sermons - Google Books Result

Edit:
Regarding Msgr. Knox's liturgical preferences, Fr. Symondson, S.J. writes:

Mgr Ronald Knox was primarily a Low Mass man. If you read Evelyn Waugh's biography you will see how he avoided all but the most necessary ceremonies when he was Catholic chaplain at Oxford. 'Incense was used only once a year. "On Shrove Tuesday he [the Chaplain] will institute a search in the attics to find out where the thurible, incense boat, incense, charcoal and aspergillum have been packed away"': page 218. The last is a quotation from a sixty-five pages long document for his successor: 'The Whole Art of Chaplain-craft'. He was bothered by the Dominican Rite: 'The 10-30 or conference Mass is said by one of the Dominicans. The bother is that the Dominicans insist on saying an odd kind of Mass, which needs a server accustomed to the rite.':page 217. Benediction was not given because it could be found elsewhere in Oxford.

Later, when he was living at Mells, in Somerset, his daily Mass said in the private oratory of the house was also a Low Mass. There were no opportunities for ceremonial.

As an Anglo-Catholic he seems to have enjoyed ceremonial a little more but his autobiography, 'A Spiritual Aenied', implies that, after ordination, the grip of Low, rather than High, Mass seized him. He wanted to avoid the taint of merely being 'High Church'; he preferred 'Low Church' Catholicism. But he seems to have enjoyed the Baroquerie of his Anglo-Catholic associates. This evaporated after his conversion.

He did not for a minute begrudge the splendour of the liturgy but felt happier with reserve in a splendid setting. Nobody can doubt his orthodoxy, nor can he be tarnished with the brush of post-Vatican II minimalism as he died in 1957 long before there was the hint of a council. He was not interested in liturgical movements. Knox's is now a rarely found position because so much has changed but it was shared by many other priests at the time.
S. M. Hutchens, The House of Lords, American-Style

U2, With or Without You



alt
@ Crunchy Con: College: A Cruel Hoax For Some

Robert Baer, Playing the Iraq Oil Card

Friday, May. 09, 2008
Playing the Iraq Oil Card

If anyone had any doubt that Iraq was a lot about oil, they shouldn't after the recent Capitol Hill appearance by our ambassador to Baghdad, Ryan Crocker. In a closed House hearing, Crocker put the fear of god in Congress. His message: If we leave Iraq, Iraq will destabilize the Gulf, and a destabilized Gulf equals unstable oil prices.

With oil bumping pushing past $120 a barrel, you can bet you could hear a pin drop in the room. But what exactly was he talking about? Iraqi Shi'a militias invading Kuwait and Saudi Arabia, burning their oil fields, driving the price of gasoline up to $10 a gallon and us into a depression? Crocker wouldn't elaborate on his vague warnings, preferring to leave it at a sense of dread.

There was a time when we could count on Saudi Arabia to make up a shortfall in oil when something like Iraq came up. During the Gulf War Saudi Arabia boosted its production by 3.1 million barrels a day to make up for the 5.1 million barrels a day of Kuwaiti and Iraqi production that was taken off markets. Oil prices rose relatively little.

Today, Saudi Arabia either refuses or can't increase its production. The peak oil Cassandras are convinced the Saudis can't. Saudi Arabia's mega fields like Ghawar are depleted, they say. And we'd better get used to gasoline at $4 a gallon and up.

But Crocker wasn't all bad news. He said that if we were to stabilize Iraq, and attract investors to the oil sector, Iraq could become the largest producer in the world, surpassing Saudi Arabia. Crocker didn't put it in terms this baldly, but he might as well have said: We keep an army in Iraq, and we go back to the days of cheap oil. Anyone can afford to drive an SUV if they want one.

Crocker assured Congress that we are making progress. The Iraqi government retook the port of Basra that week, Iraq's main export terminal. And now that the government is in full control of Iraq's oil infrastructure things will get better.

What Crocker didn't talk about was Iran — and its plans for Iraq's oil. Months before retaking Basra, the Iraqi government started talks with Iran about running an oil pipeline to Abadan, Iran's main export terminal. Iran also has said that it will have a say in Iraq's mega field Majnun, which may contain 30 billion barrels of oil — a rival to Saudi Arabia's larger field. I suspect, though, if he'd been asked about Iran, Crocker would have said it is simply one more reason we should stay in Iraq, to keep Iran at bay.

Crocker could be right. We have no idea what is on the mind of the populist Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr. If Sadr were allowed control of the Basra oil terminal, would he shut down Iraq's oil exports? Shell Kuwaiti fields?

Nobody really knows, which is just what the Bush Administration is counting on. They got us into this mess in the first place by preying on people's fears, and now they are continuing to do so. And $10 a gallon for gasoline is his equivalent of an economic WMD.

Robert Baer, a former CIA field officer assigned to the Middle East, is TIME.com's intelligence columnist and the author of See No Evil and, most recently, the novel Blow the House Down.



via EB

Can we measure happiness?

via EB:

Interview with Mark Anielski: The Economics of Happiness
Hassan Masum, WorldChanging
We recently had a chance to talk with Mark Anielski, Albertan and author of The Economics of Happiness: Building Genuine Wealth. Mark has been working for many years on better ways of measuring progress, and this conversation delves into the potential of moving beyond GNP. Whether in measuring a sense of community or valuing ecosystem goods and services, better measures of progress can align us on the targets that really matter.
(9 May 2008)

WorldChanging: Interview with Mark Anielski

Related Links:
ANIELSKI Management Inc.
New Society Publishers - The Economics of Happiness
Amazon.com: The Economics of Happiness: Building Genuine Wealth ...
YouTube - How to Boil A Frog presents Mark Anielski
Realty Times - The Economics of Happiness: What Do You Value?

Consumerism: Curses and Causes
Rick Wolff, MR Zine (Monthly Review)
US consumerism -- citizens driven excessively to buy goods and services and accumulate consumable wealth -- is cursed almost everywhere. Many environmentalists blame it for global warming. Critics of the current economic disasters often point to home-buying gluttony as the cause. Many see consumerism behind the borrowing that makes the US the world's greatest debtor nation today. Moralists of otherwise diverse motivations agree on attacking consumerist materialism as against spiritual values. Educators blame it for distracting young people's interest from learning. Psychologists attribute mass loneliness and depression to unrealizable expectations of what commodities can deliver to consumers. Physicians decry the diseases, stress, and exhaustion linked to excessive work driven by desire for excessive consumption. Yet, for a long time, exhortations by all such folks have mostly failed to slow, let alone reverse, US consumerism.

Moss trailer

@ Twitch

Fallen Angels coming to Blu-ray

From KFCCinema:

Source: Blu-ray.com
Just days after Criterion Collection announced their jump to the high definition format, now comes word that Kino International will soon make their introduction. First out of the gates in the fall is rumored to be Wong Kar Wai's Fallen Angels. Supplements have yet to be revealed, however, one would assume the Blu-Ray features would at the very least mirror that of their previous standard release.


Criterion Collection will have a Blue-Ray edition of Chungking Express.

Magister, Pentecost on Mount Athos

Pentecost on Mount Athos

A voyage to the holy mountain of the Orthodox Church. First conducted and recounted in 1997. Meaning now, this year. Because on Athos, earthly time is one and the same as the eternal today of heaven





Athos The Holy Mountain ---- Mount Athos ----- Holy Mountain ...
Άγιον Όρος
Mount Athos
Mount Athos - The Holy Mountain - Monachos.net
Mount Athos - OrthodoxWiki
Mount Athos Monasteries Photos
Mount Athos - UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Mount Athos - Perceptions of the Holy Mountain
Mount Athos: An Introduction
The Friends of Mount Athos -- A Pilgrim's Guide -- Contents
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Mount Athosa
Ouranoupolis and Mount Athos
The Holy Mount Athos
Youtube:Philotheou Monastery Mount Athos

From Google Books:
Mount Athos: Renewal in Paradise - by Graham Speake - 308 pages
Catalogue of the Greek manuscripts on mount Athos - by Spyridōn Paulou Lampros, Spyr. P. Lambros
Wisdom from Mount Athos: The Writings of ... - by Siluan, Sofroniĭ - 127 pages


Esphigmenou Monastery
Holy Esphigmenou Monastery
Mt Athos and Esphigmenou Monastery - Monachos.net Discussion Community
Esphigmenou Monastery (Athos) - OrthodoxWiki
Mount Athos: The Monastery of Esphigmenou
Esphigmenou Monastery

Future Weapons: The Kriss .45 Calibre Sub-Machine Gun



kriss .45 sub machine gun - AOL Video

dakarm's choice

Friday, May 09, 2008

We're still waiting for the evidence

while some persist to push for an attack on Iran because of its alleged support of Iraqi 'insurgents'...

From @TAC:
Quiet. Too, Too Quiet
War With Iran Might Be Closer Than You Think
Jon Hassler’s Hope by Charlotte Hays

1933-2008: Author Jon Hassler wrote right to the end

wiki
Jon Hassler's Writing Room
The Wit, Wisdom and Wonder of Writer Jon Hassler - November 1998 ...
Remembering Jon Hassler
Laurence Vance, The Right to Not Pledge to the Flag

Interesting. Ever since it was brought up that the word "indivisible" in the pledge is problematic (which seems to deny the right to secession), I have found it suspect. Some other articles from LRC:

Pledging Allegiance to the Omnipotent Lincolnian State by Thomas J ...
Here We Go Again by Anthony Gregory
Patriot Socialists (and Neocons)- by Daniel Mccarthy
From IGN: Insight into the Mind of a Director
Director Tarsem and actor Lee Pace discuss The Fall.

The Fall Review
Tarsem creates a reference-disc classic with his follow-up to The Cell.

Zenit: Fr. Cantalamessa's Gospel Commentary for Feast of Pentecost

Power From Above

Gospel Commentary for Feast of Pentecost

By Father Raniero Cantalamessa, OFM Cap

ROME, MAY 9, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Everyone has on some occasion seen people pushing a stalled car trying to get it going fast enough to start. There are one or two people pushing from behind and another person at the wheel. If it does not get going after the first try, they stop, wipe away the sweat, take a breath and try again. ...

Then suddenly there is a noise, the engine starts to work, the car moves on its own and the people who were pushing it straighten themselves up and breathe a sigh of relief.

This is an image of what happens in Christian life. One goes forward with much effort, without great progress. But we have a very powerful engine ("the power from above!") that only needs to be set working. The feast of Pentecost should help us to find this engine and and see how to get it going.

The account from the Acts of the Apostles begins thus: "When the time for Pentecost was fulfilled, they were all together in the same place."

From these words, we see that Pentecost pre-existed Pentecost. In other words, there was already a feast of Pentecost in Judaism and it was during this feast that the Holy Spirit descended. One cannot understand the Christian Pentecost without taking into account the Jewish Pentecost that prepared it.

In the Old Testament there were two interpretations of the feast of Pentecost. At the beginning there was the feast of the seven weeks, the feast of the harvest, when the first fruits of grain were offered to God, but then, and certainly during Jesus' time, the feast was enriched with a new meaning: It was the feast of the conferral of the law and of the covenant on Mount Sinai.

If the Holy Spirit descends upon the Church precisely on the day in which Israel celebrated the feast of the law and the covenant, this indicates that the Holy Spirit is the new law, the spiritual law that sealed the new and eternal covenant. A law that is no longer written on stone tablets but on tablets of flesh, on the hearts of men.

These considerations immediately provoke a question: Do we live under the old law or the new law? Do we fulfill our religious duties by constraint, by fear and habit, or rather by an intimate conviction and almost by attraction? Do we experience God as a father or a boss?

I conclude with a story. At the beginning of the last century a family from southern Italy emigrated to the United States. Not having enough money to pay for meals at restaurants, they took bread and cheese with them for the trip. As the days and weeks passed the bread became stale and the cheese moldy; at a certain point their child could not take it anymore and could do nothing but cry.

The parents took the last bit of money that they had and gave it to him so that he could have a nice meal at a restaurant. The child went, ate and came back to his parents in tears. The parents asked: "We have spent all the money we had left to buy you a nice meal and you are still crying?"

"I am crying because I found out that one meal a day was included in the price and this whole time we have been eating bread and cheese!"

Many Christians go through life with only "bread and cheese," without joy, without enthusiasm, when they could, spiritually speaking, every day enjoy every good thing of God, it all being included in the price of being Christians.

The secret for experiencing that which John XXIII called "a new Pentecost" is called prayer. That is where we find the "spark" that starts the engine!

Jesus promised that the heavenly Father would give the Holy Spirit to those who asked for him (Luke 11:13). Ask then! The liturgy of Pentecost offers us magnificent words to do this:

"Come, Holy Spirit ...

Come, O Father of the poor,
Ever bounteous of Thy store,
Come, our heart's unfailing light.
Come, Consoler, kindest, best,
Come, our bosom's dearest guest,
Sweet refreshment, sweet repose.
Rest in labor, coolness sweet,
Tempering the burning heat,
Truest comfort of our woes!"

Come Holy Spirit!

[Translation by Joseph G. Trabbic]

* * *

Father Raniero Cantalamessa is the Pontifical Household preacher. The readings for this Sunday are Acts 2:1-11; 1 Corinthians 12:3b-7, 12-13; John 20:19-23.

Zenit: Patriarch: Modernity Demands Christian Unity

Patriarch: Modernity Demands Christian Unity

Karekin II Lauds Close Relations With Catholic Church

ROME, MAY 9, 2008 (Zenit.org).- The Armenian Apostolic Church and the Catholic Church have a duty to be ever more united in their defense of human rights, said Karekin II, Catholicos of All Armenians.

The patriarch affirmed this today at a press conference at Vatican Radio, shortly after having been received in audience by Benedict XVI. Karekin II and a delegation of bishops and Armenian Apostolic faithful are in Rome for events through Sunday.

The Armenian Church leader emphasized the positive state of relations between the two Churches.

Noting centuries of effort toward unity and a common declaration signed in 1970 by Pope Paul VI and Armenian Patriarch Vasken I, Karekin II said the current visit "comes once again to reinforce that warm atmosphere of love and respect which was formed between our two Churches."

"The love received from our Lord Jesus Christ bears much good fruit in the field of ecumenism today. Faithful to the holy Church fathers and their legacy, despite our differences and unique characteristics, we shall place greater importance on that which unites us," he said.

The Armenian Apostolic Church separated from Rome after the Council of Chalcedon in 451, over controversy arising from the council's adoption of the Christological terminology of two natures in one person. However, most now agree that the controversy arose over semantics, not doctrine.

It has since taken steps toward unity, notably thanks to a 1996 declaration signed by Pope John Paul II and Patriarch Karekin I on the nature of Jesus.

Warm and close

Karekin II said it is "especially pleasing for us to confirm that the spirit of love and collaboration between the Armenian and Catholic Churches finds its tangible expression in our times. The living testimony to the Spirit can be found in the fact that relations between our two Churches are warm and close, not only at the level of Church leaders and headquarters, but also among the communities, parishes and dioceses throughout the world."

The Armenian patriarch said that in a globalized world with its political, social and economic challenges, "the greater consolidation of diligent efforts and partnership are an imperative for Christian Churches. [...] Only through inclusive cooperation shall we be able to better serve the establishment of peace in the world and to better defend human rights, and the rights of nations, families, and those classes of society which are at-risk.

"The transfiguration of life through the values of the Gospel shall be our path to the creation of a prosperous and virtuous world."

Christianity in Armenia traces its roots back to the preaching of the Apostles Bartholomew and Thaddeus.

The Armenian people converted to Christ at the dawn of the fourth century, in the year 301. A century later, the monk Mesrop Mastoc invented the Armenian alphabet so as to be able to translate the Bible.

Michael Bublé - Home



For Sarge... please keep him in your prayers as he is being deployed today.

Going to have to wait for Episode 7...

for more Macross action.



At the end of episode 6, the SMS leaves on its rescue mission...

Walter B. Jones

Walter B. Jones: The North Carolinian Republicans in Illinois Should Be Watching
By Christopher Check, Rockford Institute

via Chronicles: Walter B. Jones: Successful Antiwar Republican

Congressman Walter B. Jones - Student Center by DexteraNet
From the official website:

Congressman Jones receives the Marine Corps Reserve Association's Major Frank M. Tejeda Leadership Award from the Commandant of the Marine Corps. - General Michael Hagee, Commandant of the Marine Corps, presents the prestigious award to Congressman Jones.

Walter Jones for Congress

Domenico Zipoli

Domenico Zipoli
HOASM: Domenico Zipoli
DOMENICO ZIPOLI, Biography, Discography
wiki
Fonógrafo blog entry (includes portrait)

Domenico Zipoli Institute
Domenico Zipoli Ensemble

Both of the groups have performed Latin American Baroque music at Our Lady of Peace Shrine?

Te Deum - Domenico Zipoli


Laudate Pueri - Domenico Zipoli


domenico zipoli al postcommunio antichi organi

Thursday, May 08, 2008

2 Palestina vids

Tu es Petrus - Kulturno Drustvo Komo


Adoramus te (Palestrina)par le Choeur du Val d'Or


Domingo Zipoli - Concert Graduacion Promo 34

Liverpool/Chiles: Pardon Our Dust -- Sicut Cervus

Leelee Sobieski photos

@ TunaFlix

Bustamante - Al Filo De La Irrealidad

I haven't been keeping up with Latin pop for a while... it looks like things have not changed much in the industry.

MV

Another 'advantage' of breast-feeding?

Breastfed children are brainier, study suggests
Breast-fed children found smarter | Health | Reuters

via LRC

Catholic Nursing Mothers League
Mothering Through Breastfeeding - Catholic Breastfeeding with Pam ...
LLLI | Home
LLLI | Store
LLLUSA
La Leche League Mother-to-Mother Forums
The #1 site for Breastfeeding Information, Support & Attitude!
Breastfeeding: Introduction | DNPAO | CDC
Hayley Westenra - You'll Never Walk Alone (2001)


For Sarge...

Carrie Underwood - Last Name video

For Sarge


alt

Carrie Underwood - Get Out Of This Town

Killing Rommel

Steven Pressfield's latest

via DNI

Rommel Speaking







The Field Marshall Erwin Rommel - Desert Fox Part 1 of 5
part 2 - part 3 - part 4 - part 5

Achtung Panzer! - Erwin Rommel!

The World at War: Erwin Rommel
Knight's Cross: A Life of Field Marshal Erwin Rommel - Google Books Result

The Rommel Papers - Google Books Result
Dominican Compline for the Liturgy of the Hours Update
by Fr. Augustine Thompson O.P.

Zenit: B16--On Christian Unity

On Christian Unity

"Keep Alive the Flames of Faith, Charity and Hope"

VATICAN CITY, MAY 7, 2008 (Zenit.org).- Here is the text of the greetings Benedict XVI gave today to Catholicos Karekin II, supreme patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, and a translation of the catechesis he gave afterward during his weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square.

* * *

[English Greetings to Catholicos Karekin II]

It is my great joy today to greet His Holiness Catholicos Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, and the distinguished delegation accompanying him. Your Holiness, I pray that the light of the Holy Spirit will illumine your pilgrimage to the tombs of the Apostles Peter and Paul, the important meetings you will have here, and particularly our personal conversations. I ask all who are present today to pray for God’s blessing upon this visit.

Your Holiness, I thank you for your personal commitment to the growing friendship between the Armenian Apostolic Church and the Catholic Church. In 2000, soon after your election, you came to Rome to meet Pope John Paul II, and a year later, you graciously received him in Holy Etchmiadzin. You came once again to Rome together with many Church leaders from East and West, for the funeral liturgy of Pope John Paul II. I am sure that this spirit of friendship will be further deepened during the coming days.

In an external niche of Saint Peter’s Basilica, there is a fine statue of Saint Gregory the Illuminator, founder of the Armenian Church. It serves to remind us of the severe persecutions suffered by Armenian Christians, especially during the last century. Armenia’s many martyrs are a sign of the power of the Holy Spirit working in times of darkness, and a pledge of hope for Christians everywhere.

Your Holiness, dear Bishops and dear friends, together with you I implore Almighty God, through the intercession of Saint Gregory the Illuminator, to help us grow in unity, in one holy bond of Christian faith, hope and love.

[Catechisis]

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

As you see, among us today is His Holiness Catholicos Karekin II, supreme patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, accompanied by a distinguished delegation. I express again my joy at having been able to welcome him this morning: His presence revives in us the hope of full unity among all Christians. I also would like to take advantage of the opportunity to thank him for the amiable welcome he recently offered in Armenia to the cardinal secretary of state. For me it is a pleasure to remember the unforgettable visit that the Catholicos made to Rome in 2000, a little after his election. In his encounter with him, my beloved predecessor, John Paul II, offered to him a distinguished relic of St. Gregory the Illuminator and then returned the visit by traveling to Armenia.

The commitment of the Apostolic Armenian Church in favor of ecumenical dialogue is known, and I am sure that this visit of the venerable supreme patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians will contribute to intensify the fraternal friendship that unites our Churches. These days of immediate preparation for Pentecost encourages us to revive hope in the help of the Holy Spirit to advance in the path of ecumenism. We have the certainty that the Lord Jesus will never abandon us in the search for unity, given that the Spirit acts tirelessly to bolster our efforts oriented toward overcoming every division and to mend every tear in the living cloth of the Church.

This is precisely what Jesus promised to the disciples in his last days of his earthly mission, as we just heard in the Gospel passage: He assured them of the assistance of the Holy Spirit, that he would send so they will continue to experience his presence (John 14:16-17). This promise he made a reality when, after the resurrection, Jesus entered in the Cenacle, greeted the disciples with the words, "Peace be with you" and, blowing over them, he told them, "Receive the Holy Spirit" (John 20:22). He gave them the authority to forgive sins. The Holy Spirit, then, is presented as the power of the forgiveness of sins, of the renewal of our hearts and of our existence, and in this way renews the earth and creates unity where there was division. Afterward, at the feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit is shown through other signs: an impetuous wind, tongues of fire, and the apostles speaking all languages. This last one is a sign that the Spirit, who is charity and who fosters unity in diversity, has overcome the Babylonian Diaspora, fruit of the pride that separates men. From the first moment of its existence the Church spoke all languages, thanks to the power of the Holy Spirit and the tongues of fire, and lives in all cultures. It does not destroy the gifts or the history of a culture, rather it assumes them all in a great new unity, which reconciles unity with the multiplicity of forms.

The Holy Spirit, which is eternal charity, the link of unity in the Trinity, unites with its power in divine charity the dispersed men, creating in this way the great and multiform community of the Church in the entire world. In the days that passed between the Ascension of the Lord and the Sunday of Pentecost, the disciples were united with Mary in the Cenacle to pray. They knew that alone they couldn't found, organize the Church: the Church had to be established and organized by a divine initiative; it is not a creature of ours, but rather a gift of God. Only in this way is unity also created, a unity that has to grow. The Church in all times, and in particular in those nine days between the Ascension and Pentecost, unites itself spiritually in the Cenacle with the apostles and with Mary to implore incessantly the effusion of the Holy Spirit. Moved by the impetuous wind it will be capable of announcing the Gospel to the furthest confines of the earth.

For this reason, despite the difficulties and divisions, Christians cannot resign themselves, nor give in to discouragement. This is what the Lord asks us: Hold fast in prayer to keep alive the flames of faith, charity and hope, which nourish the longing for full unity. "Ut unum sint!" says the Lord. This invitation from Christ always resounds in our hearts; an invitation that I launched again in my recent apostolic trip to the United States of America, where I referred to the centrality of prayer in the ecumenical movement. In this time of globalization, and at the same time, of fragmentation, "without [prayer], ecumenical structures, institutions and programs would be deprived of their heart and soul" (ecumenical encounter in the Church of St. Joseph in New York, April 18, 2008). Let us give thanks to the Lord for the goals reached in ecumenical dialogue thanks to the action of the Holy Spirit. Let us be docile, listening to his voice so that our hearts, full of hope, set out without delay on the path that leads to the communion of all Christ's disciples.

St. Paul, in the letter to the Galatians, recalls that "the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control" (Galatians 5:22-23). These are the gifts of the Holy Spirit that we also invoke today over all Christians, so that in the mutual and generous service of the Gospel, they can be in the world a sign of the love of God for humanity. Let us direct, with trust, our gaze to Mary, sanctuary of the Holy Spirit, and through her, let us pray, "Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful and enkindle in them the fire of your love." Amen.

[Translation by ZENIT]

[After his address, the Holy Father greeted the pilgrims in various languages. In English, he said:]

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Today we welcome to our Audience His Holiness Catholicos Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians, together with a delegation from the Armenian Apostolic Church. His presence among us, in these days before the Solemnity of Pentecost, spurs us to pray more fervently for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon all Christians as we seek to advance along the path of ecumenism. The Risen Lord sent the Spirit upon his disciples, and from the day of Pentecost, the Church has constantly implored the Spirit’s gifts, which impel her to proclaim the Gospel before all the world. The presence and activity of the Spirit remind us that Christ never abandons his Church. The Spirit sustains our efforts to overcome division, to persevere in prayer and to work for Christian unity. Prayer is the heart and soul of the ecumenical movement. Today, let us join in thanking the Lord for the Spirit’s work in fostering ecumenical dialogue and inspiring the hope of full unity. May the gifts of the Spirit lead all Christians to serve the Gospel with generosity and to be a sign of God’s love for all humanity. With Mary, let us pray: "Come, Holy Spirit, fill the hearts of your faithful, and kindle in them the fire of your love! Amen."

I offer a warm welcome to the Delegates taking part in the Annual Conference of the Canon Law Society of Great Britain and Ireland. I am also pleased to greet the pilgrims from Our Lady of the Rosary Church in Qatar. Upon all the English-speaking pilgrims, especially those from England, Scotland, Australia, India, Indonesia, Korea, Canada, Guam and the United States, I cordially invoke Almighty God’s abundant blessings of joy and peace.

[After his greetings, the Holy Father made the following appeal in Italian:]

I make my own the cry of pain and the call for assistance of the dear people of Myanmar, who without warning saw so many lives, and so much property and means of sustenance destroyed by the terrifying violence of the Cyclone Nargis.

As I already said in the message of solidarity I sent to the president of the episcopal conference, I remain spiritually close to the people affected. I would also like to repeat to everyone my call to open their hearts to pity and generosity so that, thanks to the collaboration of people who can and wish to bring help, the suffering caused by such an immense tragedy may be relieved.

(c) Copyright 2008 -- Libreria Editrice Vaticana

Photos: Swiss Guard


New recruits of the Vatican's elite Swiss Guard stand at attention during the swearing in ceremony at Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican May 6, 2008. The Swiss Guard, founded in 1506 and consisting of 100 volunteers who must be Swiss, Catholic, single, at least 174 centimetres tall and beardless, celebrate their 502nd anniversary this year. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date in which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the Pope during an attack on Rome on May 6, 1527. There are 33 new recruits sworn in for this year.

REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)

REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


A new recruit of the Vatican's elite Swiss Guard gestures during the swearing in ceremony at Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican May 6, 2008. The Swiss Guard, founded in 1506 and consisting of 100 volunteers who must be Swiss, Catholic, single, at least 174 centimetres tall and beardless, celebrate their 502nd anniversary this year. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date in which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the Pope during an attack on Rome on May 6, 1527. There are 33 new recruits sworn in for this year.
REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)

REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)

A new recruit of the Vatican's elite Swiss Guard stands at attention during the swearing in ceremony at Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican May 6, 2008. The Swiss Guard, founded in 1506 and consisting of 100 volunteers who must be Swiss, Catholic, single, at least 174 centimetres tall and beardless, celebrate their 502nd anniversary this year. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date in which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the Pope during an attack on Rome on May 6, 1527. There are 33 new recruits sworn in for this year.
REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


A new recruit of the Vatican's elite Swiss Guard gestures during the swearing in ceremony at Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican May 6, 2008. The Swiss Guard, founded in 1506 and consisting of 100 volunteers who must be Swiss, Catholic, single, at least 174 centimetres tall and beardless, celebrate their 502nd anniversary this year. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date in which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the Pope during an attack on Rome on May 6, 1527. There are 33 new recruits sworn in for this year.
REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)

A new Vatican Swiss Guard, bottom center, holds up three fingers as he is sworn it at a swearing-in ceremony of 33 new Vatican Swiss Guards, at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

A new Vatican Swiss Guard looks on prior to a swearing-in ceremony at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, pool)


A new Vatican Swiss Guard is helped to put on his uniform before a swearing-in ceremony at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, pool)

REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)

A new Vatican Swiss Guard gives a salute as he is sworn into the pontiff's elite military corps, at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

A new Vatican Swiss Guard polishes his armory in preparation to the swearing-in ceremony at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino, pool)

Commander of the Vatican Swiss Guards, Elmar Theodor Maeder, left, reviews the honor guard of the new Vatican Swiss Guards during their swearing in ceremony, at the Vatican, Tuesday, May 6, 2008. The swearing in ceremony is held each May 6 to commemorate the day in 1527 when 147 Swiss Guards died protecting Pope Clement VII during the Sack of Rome.
(AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Colonel Elmar Theodore Mader, commander of the Vatican's elite Swiss Guards, stands in front of cardinals during the swearing in ceremony of 33 new recruits at Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican May 6, 2008. The Swiss Guard, founded in 1506 and consisting of 100 volunteers who must be Swiss, Catholic, single, at least 174 centimetres tall and beardless, celebrate their 502nd anniversary this year. New recruits are sworn in every year on May 6, commemorating the date in which 147 Swiss soldiers died defending the Pope during an attack on Rome on May 6, 1527.
REUTERS/Max Rossi (VATICAN)


more

Wednesday, May 07, 2008

Gutzmann, The Trouble with Judicial Restraint

The Trouble With Judicial Restraint

by Kevin R. C. Gutzman

More on Mrs. B's class

In my 2nd grade class there is one 'tomboy'; she told me that she is the only girl on the baseball team. She also screams in class a lot; she will often react with a high-pitched "eh" or "ah." Apparently this is normal behavior at home, and her parents let her get away with it. This morning Mrs. M inquired about her; she said the girl seemed spacey, not knowing what to do or how to proceed during testing. She does have problems focusing at times; ADHD?

What if testosterone does have something to do with her behavior?

There are two girls who squeal when they get in trouble or don't get their way. I've told them not to do this and that it is annoying, but it is a bad habit for them. The two are friends, but they also tattle on each other, which I find to be rather bizarre. I end up asking many, "Isn't he/she your friend? Why are you tattling on him/her?"

There are also some boys in the class who scream "like girls" in class as a way of reacting, either to prohibitions or threats of punishment. Some boys are sensitive and cry over minor things. I don't know what the cause of that is--their upbringing and/or home environment? I remember crying in school only because of bullying, and instead of crying I should have been "pro-active," but no one taught me to do that or that it was right. So I can appreciate Dr. Laura encouraging parents to teach their children to stand up for themselves, even if it seems that the public school system frowns upon it.

I suspect that for at least one, it is the case that there is little guidance or support from a male authority figure.

Usually it's easy to be unaware that the students are of a certain socio-economic background. But then you meet or see their parents...

The age of educational romanticism, by Charles Murray; (wwtw discussion; Crunchy Con)

Such educational romanticism is dependent upon certain assumptions about human nature and intelligence.

Photos: Benedict XVI and Karekin II


Pope Benedict XVI (R) greets Supreme Patriarch Catholicos Karekin II of the Holy Armenian Apostolic Church during a weekly general audience at the Vatican May 7, 2008.
(Osservatore Romano/Reuters)

Karekin II, the head of Armenia's Orthodox Church, attends Pope Benedict XVI's weekly general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, May 7, 2008. Karekin II sat at Benedict's side during the traditional weekly audience in St. Peter's Square, part of a visit to the Vatican that is the latest high-level contact between Catholic and Orthodox leaders.
(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

Pope Benedict XVI greets Supreme Patriarch Catholicos Karekin II of the Holy Armenian Apostolic Church (L) as he leads his weekly general audience in Saint Peter's square at the Vatican May 7, 2008.
REUTERS/Dario Pignatelli (VATICAN)

Pope Benedict XVI greets Supreme Patriarch Catholicos Karekin II of the Holy Armenian Apostolic Church (L) as he leads his weekly general audience in Saint Peter's square at the Vatican May 7, 2008.
REUTERS/Dario Pignatelli (VATICAN)

One Fine Day - Hayley Westenra

Wonderful slideshow...

Photos: Benedict XVI at the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra concert


Pope Benedict XVI applauds during a concert by the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 7, 2008.

REUTERS/Dario Pignatelli (VATICAN)

China Philharmonic Orchestra Soprano Lan Rao, at right, looks on as Conductor long Yu performs, at left, with other members of the orchestra, during a concert in Pope Paul VI hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, May 7, 2008. The China Philharmonic Orchestra performed for the pontiff in a landmark concert Wednesday that could indicate warming relations between Beijing and the Vatican. Benedict called it a 'truly unique event' and offered a 'thank you' in Chinese at the end of the hour-long concert.

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

The Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra performs during a concert in Pope Paul VI hall at the Vatican, attended by Pope Benedict XVI, Wednesday, May 7, 2008. China's Philharmonic Orchestra performed for the pontiff in a landmark concert Wednesday that could indicate warming relations between Beijing and the Vatican.

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

China Philarmonic Orchestra soprano Lan Rao, right, foreground, kneels before Pope Benedict XVI during a concert in Pope Paul VI hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, May 7, 2008. The China Philharmonic Orchestra performed for the pontiff in a landmark concert Wednesday that could indicate warming relations between Beijing and the Vatican. Benedict called it a 'truly unique event' and offered a 'thank you' in Chinese at the end of the hour-long concert.

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)

Pope Benedict XVI greets soprano singer Lan Rao at the end of a concert by the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 7, 2008.

REUTERS/Dario Pignatelli

From left, China Philarmonic Orchestra Soprano Lan Rao, Mezzosoprano Zheng Cao, Conductor long Yu, partially hidden by Pope Benedict XVI, in white, pose for a photo with other members of the orchestra, during a concert in Pope Paul VI hall at the Vatican, Wednesday, May 7, 2008. The China Philharmonic Orchestra performed for the pontiff in a landmark concert Wednesday that could indicate warming relations between Beijing and the Vatican. Benedict called it a 'truly unique event' and offered a 'thank you' in Chinese at the end of the hour-long concert.

(AP Photo/Plinio Lepri)


Pope Benedict XVI is greeted by the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra's music director Long Yu at the end of a concert in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 7, 2008.

(Dario Pignatelli/Reuters)


Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra's music director Long Yu acknowledges the public during a concert for Pope Benedict XVI in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 7, 2008.

(Dario Pignatelli/Reuters)

Pope Benedict XVI attends a concert by the Chinese Philharmonic Orchestra in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 7, 2008.

(Dario Pignatelli/Reuters)

The Holy Father always looks so intense during concerts.