Saturday, May 22, 2010

Mish: College Grads about to Flood Labor Market; Class of 2009 Still Without Jobs in Deep Trouble
Sandro Magister, The Pope, the Cardinals, the Jesuits. Three Responses to the Scandal

The royal road sketched out by Benedict XVI. Schönborn and O'Malley's shots at Sodano. The roles of Bertone and Fr. Lombardi. The battle of "La Civiltà Cattolica" against the "culture of pedophilia"

NY Times review of War by Sebastian Junger. The author will be in town tomorrow.

Telegraph: Combat zone: extracts from Sebastian Junger's War
Good Morning America: Excerpt: 'War' By Sebastian Junger
Giselle from Life After RC on NPR. (Click on the May 20 program?)
Philip Giraldi, Cannes Goes Covert

(A spirited discussion of Rand Paul and the Civil Rights Act at @TAC.)

Totus Tuus: Where to Learn Painting Icons in Korea?

Totus Tuus: Where to Learn Painting Icons in Korea?

(h/t to the Western Confucian)

The Icon Institute website.

One can dream about a wave of Korean iconographers sweeping through Catholic parishes and writing icons.
I was trying to search the blog for a book about SF but I had no luck. I was reminded of Roughneck Nine-One, though. Here is a review in the Army Times. No luck finding the title at this website.
Dr. Peter Gilbert reads the NT in Greek.

Tallis

1. Miserere nostri 2. Loquebantur variis linguis 3. If ye love me.
CJ Howard's thesis on urbanism, sustainability, and the Catholic university (via Mirror of Justice)
Zenit: Papal Words at Concert of Moscow Patriarchate
"Let Us Make Europe Breathe With Its Two Lungs Again"

Moscow Patriarch's Message to Benedict XVI
"To Understand a People, It Is Necessary to Listen to Its Music"

Photos here.

Members of Sinodal Chorus of Moskow perform during a concert in honor of Pope Benedict XVI offered by Russia's Orthodox Patriarch Kirill in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 20, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

Italian orchestra director Carlo Ponti conducts a concert in honor of Pope Benedict XVI offered by Russia's Orthodox Patriarch Kirill in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 20, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI delivers his message during a concert dedicated to him by Patriarch Kirill I of Moscow, in the hall Paul VI at the Vatican, Thursday, May 20, 2010. (AP/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI (R) talks with orchestra director Carlo Ponti at the end of a concert in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 20, 2010.(Reuters/Daylife)

Thanks for the equivocation on the word "life"

Craig Venter unveils "synthetic life"



Craig Venter creates synthetic life form

J. Craig Venter Institute
Edge bio

Hawaiian Libertarian on Frontier Feminism and Sarah Palin.
Stephen Hand interviews John Médaille on distributism, of course.

Friday, May 21, 2010

Mike Whitney, Meltdown in the EU
Missing the slums for the cities
Rahul Goswami, Energy Bulletin

Cities in Asia are hubs of production, innovation and wealth, funnelling into themselves immense resources, water, energy, food, drawing in from nearby districts and far-off provinces families and entire communities.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Capella Romana

Their website.




This blog hasn't been updated for a while.
Eirenikon: Metropolitan Hilarion (Alfeyev) in Italy

From today:


Methropolite Hilarion Alfeyev (C) reads a message from Russian Patriarch Kirill I to Pope Benedict XVI prior to a concert in the Paolo VI hall at the Vatican on May 20, 2010, to mark the Russian day of culture and spirituality. (Getty/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI welcomes Methropolite Hilarion Alfeyev (R) prior to the concert offer by Russian Patriarch Kirill I in the Paolo VI hall at the Vatican on May 20, 2010, to mark the Russian day of culture and spirituality. (Getty/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI is greeted by Metropolita of Volokolamsk Hilarion Alfeyev (R) before of a concert in his honor offered by Russia's Orthodox Patriarch Kirill in Paul VI hall at the Vatican May 20, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI (L) welcomes Methropolite Hilarion Alfeyev (C) as Italian actress Sofia Loren (2R) prior to the concert offered by Russian Patriarch Kirill I in the Paolo VI hall at the Vatican on May 20, 2010, to mark the Russian day of culture and spirituality. (Getty/Daylife)

Hilarion Alfeyev, Metropolitan of Volokolamsk, chairman of the Department of External Church Relations and permanent member of the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Moscow, background, looks at Pope Benedict XVI clapping during a concert dedicated to the pontiff by Patriarch Kirill I of Moscow, in the hall Paul VI at the Vatican, Friday, May 20, 2010. (AP/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI, left, Hilarion Alfeyev, Metropolitan of Volokolamsk, chairman of the Department of External Church Relations and permanent member of the Holy Synod of the Patriarchate of Moscow, center, and German Cardinal Walter Kasper, right, applaud during a concert dedicated to the pontiff by Patriarch Kirill I of Moscow, in the hall Paul VI at the Vatican, Thrusday, May 20, 2010. (AP/Daylife)

Pope Benedict XVI (L), flanked by Metropolite Hilarion Alfeyev (C), welcomes Italian actress Sofia Loren (R) at the end of the concert offered by Russian Patriarch Kirill I in the Paolo VI hall at the Vatican on May 20, 2010, to mark the russian day of culture and spirituality. (Getty/Daylife)

Two from California Catholic Daily

California Catholic Daily: “An amazing, an amazing, simply amazing father to us all”
Archbishop Gomez gives emotional farewell to San Antonio; reception Mass slated May 26 in Los Angeles

And: Serious Spiritual Direction
From Argentina via Michigan to California

Another group dedicated to giving the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola? I have to ask: how is their liturgy? The order is into Gregorian chant apparently.

Related links:
Miles Christi (Argentina website)
Dr. Esolen reflects on Time and Eternity, on the occasion of his daughter's graduation from Providence College.
NLM: Compline in Dominican Chant Published

(Dominican Liturgy)
CUA: Catholic University of America Architecture Symposium 2010 (via NLM)
From the beginning to the end of Neo-Liberalism in Britain
Mike Rustin, OpenDemocracy

The financial crash that brought the era of neo-liberalism to an end has now led to the formation of a novel coalition in Britain after 65 years of single-party government. This essay argues that it is important to understand what is special about the underlying economic and social crisis - and how the balance of forces is very different from those that wracked Britain in the 1970s and opened the way to Margaret Thatcher.

(original)
From yesterday's Counterpunch:
Mike Whitney, The Road to Recession

John Ross, The Feminization of Mexican Agriculture

Elizabeth Gould/Paul Fitzgerald, Predator Blowback: a Bad Omen for America

And a connection I had not read about until this point: Joshua Frank, Elena Kagan and Monsanto

Photos: Bundeswehr in Afghanistan


A shepherd with his sheep pass a German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) near the Kunduz river during patrol in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 13, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

A shepherd with his sheep passes in front of German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF near the Kunduz river as they patrol the Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 13, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF monitors the area next to his armoured vehicle during a patrol in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 13, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF patrols near the Kunduz river during a mission in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 13, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF monitors the area as an amroured personnel carrier 'Fuchs' is seen in the background during a patrol in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 13, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF scan the area after U.S. army and Afghan army (ANA) soldiers were ambushed in the village of Gul Baq, in the Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)


German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) take cover after detecting a suspicious site during their search for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force QRF search for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) on a road in Chahar Dara district, on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)


German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) as they patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

A boy waves to German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) as they patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010.

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) aims his weapon while scanning an area during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) take cover after detecting a suspicious site during their search for improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in Chahar Dara district on the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 12, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) gather behind a boy sitting on a bench at a local school during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) monitor the area while on patrol during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) listen during a briefing before a mission in a combat outpost in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

[Sarge, there's your gf.]

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) aims his weapon while scanning an area next to a transmission station of an Afghan mobile phone provider during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. Armed insurgents set fire to the transmission station on Monday, according to guards of the station. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German Bundeswehr army soldier with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) greets a sheepherder during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)



German Bundeswehr army soldiers with the 3rd company of the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) walk past sheep during a mission in Chahar Dara district in the outskirts of Kunduz, northern Afghanistan, May 11, 2010. (Reuters/Daylife)

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Lars Walker on Sigrid Undset.

The Archdruid Report: Garlic, Chainsaws, and Victory Gardens

The Archdruid Report: Garlic, Chainsaws, and Victory Gardens

Ground War

Tonight on PBS -- Ground War. The trailer for the first episode. From the episode description:
"And looking towards the future, we see the development of wearable exoskeletons that will one day soon make human soldiers stronger and faster, and advanced robotic soldiers that may one day replace them completely."

We'll probably see current development projects like Future Force Warrior, the kind of goofy stuff featured in Ghost Recon: Future Warrior. Maybe that's what an "objective reporter" does, but there should be some critique as well, if they are really going to look at the "future" of warfare.

Related:
Future Force Warrior System > Infantry Combat System
Future Warrior Suit 2020
Making the Army's First Titanium Machine Gun – PEO SOLDIER LIVE
Future Force Warrior: A Look At The Soldier Of Tomorrow
Future Force Warrior Infantry Combat Suits
Program Details - Warrior Systems - Future Force Warrior Overview
Technology, Systems & Program Integration Directorate (TSPID)
Military Photos

Photos: Patriarch Bartholomew in Bulgaria


Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I (R) blesses a baby during his visit to the town of Nesebar, some 410 km (255 miles) east from capital Sofia, May 18, 2010. Patriarch Bartholomew arrived in Bulgaria on a two-day official visit.

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, left, observes the archeological museum exponents in the Black sea town of Sozopol east of the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Wednesday, May, 19, 2010. Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I arrived on a two day official visit to Bulgaria. (AP/Daylife)

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I (C) leads the mass at the new East-Orthodox church in the town of Saint Vlass, some 420 km (260 miles) east from capital Sofia, May 18, 2010. Patriarch Bartholomew arrived in Bulgaria on a two-day official visit. (Reuters/Daylife)

Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I, looks at an icon during a mass at a church in the Black sea town of Sozopol east of the Bulgarian capital Sofia, Wednesday, May, 19, 2010. Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I arrived on a two day official visit to Bulgaria. (AP/Daylife)


Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I (C) leads the mass at the main church in the town of Sozopol, some 430 kilometres (267 miles) east of capital Sofia May 19, 2010. Patriarch Bartholomew arrived in Bulgaria on Tuesday for a two-day official visit. (Reuters/Daylife)

An oldie from Alan Wall

Regarding Thalia, and how seriously citizenship is taken in this country: Your Fellow Citizen—Thalia!

(via Rebellion)

The callousness of China

Fr. Z: Horror story in China

Would Americans treat their dogs and cats in this way?

"Retribution is a *****." And it may be coming soon.

Korea follows the industrial nations

Korea Times: Men want superwoman wife
Chosun Ilbo: Ex-Actress Shows Up at Husband's Seoul Campaign Office

Shim Eun-ha on Sunday visits the campaign camp for her husband Ji Sang-wook, the Liberty Forward Party candidate for Seoul mayor. /Newsis

How did he beat out the competition?

Two on the consequences of the Big Leak

The Peak Oil Crisis: The Deepwater Horizon
Tom Whipple, Falls Church News-Press

Recommendations stemming from the recently announced independent Presidential Commission on the tragedy will likely have much influence on the course of deepwater drilling and thus the availability of oil in the future. Should the Commission conclude that much tougher regulation is necessary, it is difficult to see how the oil industry, even with its considerable clout in the Congress, can resist the calls for reform. Oil might just become far scarcer and more expensive five years from now than most of us think.



The relentless pursuit of extreme energy
Michael T. Klare, Tomdispatch

Yes, the oil spewing up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico in staggering quantities could prove one of the great ecological disasters of human history. Think of it, though, as just the prelude to the Age of Tough Oil, a time of ever increasing reliance on problematic, hard-to-reach energy sources. Make no mistake: we’re entering the danger zone. And brace yourself, the fate of the planet could be at stake.

Rod Dreher interviews Stuart Buck

'Acting White': Stuart Buck interview
"Acting White": Stuart Buck interview (Part Two)
'Acting White:' Stuart Buck interview (end)

Acting White: The Ironic Legacy of Desegregation

The author's website and blog.

Shanghai Diocese opens Matteo Ricci Year

Zenit: Matteo Ricci Year Opens in Shanghai
Shanghai diocese puts Ricci in focus for year | UCA News
Shanghai launches 'Year of Matteo Ricci' | CathNews Asia
Xu-Ricci Institute of Dialogue opens in Shanghai
Spero News
上海教区开启“利玛窦年" - 中文天主教门户网站

From Dec. 2009: Shanghai Catholics should walk on the footsteps of Matteo Ricci, Msgr Jin Luxian says


Diocese of Shanghai
沈阳天主教神学院博客
China Catholic
Associazione Matteo Ricci
"Found in Translation": Matteo Ricci's lexographic inheritance is alive (pdf)
Fudan University
哲学学院

Misc:
eRenLai
The Macau Ricci Institute - Newsletter
Orthodox Diocese of Shanghai
SJCCC
Fr. Edward McNamara: Kneeling Through the Doxology

AIP candidates for CA governor

Markham Robinson is supposedly running for the American Independent Party nomination for Governor... but he doesn't have a website? Has he withdrawn? He does have this website... Chelene Nightingale has a website, but can her candidacy be taken seriously? (The SPLC does have a report on her. How are the donations to keep the center in operation coming along?)

What is the proper response when it comes to rolling back feminism?

FB
MySpace
CAIVN profile

New American Magazine Interviews Chelene Nightingale

A Conversation with Chelene Nightingale
Blip TV




(Part 1 of 4)

A short-lived recovery in Macau?

Asia Times:
Macau strip storms back
The global credit crisis nearly killed Cotai, the landfill linking Macau's outer islands tapped to become Asia's Las Vegas Strip. Now Cotai is the region's hottest gaming address, with billions of dollars pouring in and billions more planned. - Muhammad Cohen

Two on immigration reform from The Public Discourse

Christopher O. Tollefsen, May 07, 2010
Three issues—the right to secure borders, the moral costs of illegal immigration, and the virtues of generous neighborliness and forgiveness—must be clarified in order to address the problems of immigration reform.

Michael Scaperlanda, May 11, 2010
Illegal immigration is a national problem, but Arizona’s solution is not the answer. We need to secure our borders, allow a more generous pathway to citizenship, and create a guest worker program.

Mr. Scaperlanda writes: "An alien unlawfully present can be taken into custody, charged with a state crime, and transferred to federal custody."

But he objects:

In a time of budget crisis, Arizona is likely to see a growing prison population, populated with those whose only crime is their immigration status. Otherwise lawful members of society, here illegally out of a desire to make a better life for themselves and their families, will crowd the prisons. Arizona may attempt to transfer these prisoners to federal immigration authorities for deportation, but there is no guarantee that the federal authorities will accept them. Will Arizona keep these persons jailed at public expense indefinitely? The jailed immigrants won’t be able to provide for their families, some of whom will be American citizens entitled to welfare benefits, further draining the state’s treasury.

Isn't the state going to hand them over to the federal authorities, like ICE? If the federal government does not accept them, maybe the state of Arizona will do something about it, with respect to asserting state sovereignty. (How about suing the federal government for expenses and negligence in enforcing its laws?)

In the late 19th century when the United States government was just beginning to impose immigration restrictions, the United States Supreme Court based its emerging immigration jurisprudence on a misreading of the law of nations. The Court’s plenary power doctrine meant that under our Constitution Congress possesses the absolute right to restrict immigration for any reason, including reasons at odds with our own national self-understanding. For example, the infamous Chinese Exclusion Case, which is still cited by lower courts as authoritative, established the principle that “if . . . the government of the United States, through its legislative department, considers the presence of foreigners of a different race in this country, who will not assimilate with us, to be dangerous to its peace and security, their exclusion is not to be stayed.”

In applying this principle of sovereign absolutism, the Court cited but misapplied preeminent international law thinkers including Hugo Grotius and Emmerich Vattel. Most of these authors drew upon the natural law tradition, and even Vattel, the most positivist of the bunch, understood the limits of sovereignty. In words that could have been written by Aquinas, Vattel wrote: “The earth was designed to feed its inhabitants; and he who is in want of every thing is not obliged to starve, because all property is vested in others. . . . Extreme necessity revives the primitive communion, the abolition of which ought to deprive no person the necessaries of life. . . . The same right belongs to individuals, when foreign nations refuse them a just assistance.”

Mining our western heritage, rooted in natural law, we discover that contrary to the Supreme Court’s jurisprudence, a sovereign state possesses only a qualified right to exclude foreigners from its territory. In formulating an immigration policy, Congress ought to take into account this tradition as it exercises its judgment within the broad powers allocated to it by the Court’s reading of the Constitution and international law.

This has echoes in current Catholic Social Teaching -- his citation of Vattel does not appear to support his point, since it seems to be dealing with the original common ownership of property. As for Congress taking international law into account and its broad powers? This doesn't sound right.

He continues:
Applying this tradition, five principles emerge. First, persons have a qualified right to emigrate to seek a better life for themselves and their families, especially where human flourishing is impossible in their home state. Second, states have a qualified right to restrict immigration if the common good of the members of the receiving community requires it. Third, wealthier nations have less need to restrict immigration because they can accept a greater number of immigrants without damaging the possibility of human flourishing by its existing population. Fourth, political communities have a right to expect that those within its territory will respect and obey the law. And, fifth, the law is not broken when someone—like Jean Valjean in Les Misérables—takes what he needs for survival.
I concede the right to migration; I do not concede that they have a right to join whatever political community they so wish. The two are not identical, and the author and others must show that the former entails the latter. If "a better life for themselves" is understood to involve being in community with others, then I deny it, and the author must show how this claim follows from the natural law. (It certainly does not follow from the preceding paragraph.)

He offers a three-pronged solution. The first is to secure the borders. Not so controversial. (Under the first he includes employer sanctions and improving verification.) The other two solutions:

Second, we must have some mechanism to legalize the vast majority of those who have come here illegally but who have put down roots, laboring diligently while raising and/or providing for their families. Tollefsen calls this “the virtue of generous forgiveness.”

Some readers might object on the grounds that those here illegally jumped in line, taking the places of those who have waited patiently in line in their home countries. In reality, there is no line. The United States allows 10,000 unskilled workers worldwide to immigrate to the United States every year on an employment-based immigrant visa. Assuming that all 10.8 million undocumented immigrants left the United States and got in line, it might be the year 3090 before all were accommodated.

Third, we need to adopt a temporary worker program that ebbs and flows with the economy and the demand for labor. This will allow us to protect our most vulnerable workers while providing opportunities for industrious people seeking to provide a better life for their families than can be gained in their countries of origin. In addition to testing the labor market to determine the need for such workers, two features are essential for this program’s success. First, the temporary worker must have job portability to prevent potential exploitation at the hands of one employer. Second, either temporary workers must be allowed to stay in the United States for only a relatively short period—three years, maybe—so that they do not become assimilated into American life, or they must be given a path to permanent residence and eventual citizenship. Although I do not have a strong preference between these two alternatives, the third alternative—allowing long-term “temporary workers” would be undesirable.

At least he does not go so far to say that they should be put on the path to citizenship. But easy legalization? How is this going to prevent future waves of immigration? This brings us to the third solution -- while he is aware of employers hiring illegal immigrants, he says nothing about the political economy that makes this acceptable for employers to do so. The presumption by certain Catholic authorities and by the author is that the current political economy is sustainable. What if it is not? What will have to be done then? Should there be any priority assigned to citizens when it comes to the division of resources in order to further relocalization and the readjustment to a more agrarian society?

Tomás Luis de Victoria, Te Deum laudamus

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Fred Reed, Why Mexicans Dont Like Gringos

Some immigrants, for example Europeans, quietly adapt to local habits, learn the language, exhibit the reticence that constitutes international good manners, and integrate themselves into the new country. We don’t. Americans, in which category I include Canadians, simply don’t belong in Mexico, at least most of those who come. Degrees and exceptions, yes. But…the hesitant walk, the anxious body language, the clumping together like clotting corpuscles in gringo venues—the gringos just look funny, alien, isolated. They aren’t bad people, or anyway no worse than the dismally low baseline for a race that amounts to a collection of technologized chimpanzees. They want to be liked, set up charities, try to do good works and usually succeed. It doesn’t help.
Read the rest.

I don't have a double standard -- if [Anglo- or Euro-]Americans living in Mexico think they are merely guests in the country, they should nonetheless not give offense to the natives by living ostentatiously. But if they are permanent residents, they should make an effort to assimilate into that society, or at least learn Spanish.
Thomas Fleming, Crossing the I in Idiot and the T in Tyranny

“Click it or Ticket” is the current slogan. But there is also Drive Hammered, Get Nailed. Slow Down or Pay Up, Buckle Up, IT’S THE LAW. There has been a lot of discussion on websites about the ineffectiveness of these campaigns, especially when they are promoted by police officers, who are among the worst drivers in the country and who, despite privileges that come close to immunities, are at least as prone as lesser men, to driving under the influence. Anyone remember Eliot Ness? The sanctimonious alcoholic who failed to convict Al Capone? He was involved in a drunk-driving accident, though he did escape the consequences.

But it is not the futility or the hypocrisy of these campaigns that disturb me so much as it is the bullying tone. We the taxpayers who pay the salaries have to be preached at by a set of goons, many of whom could not hold a job selling shoes at the mall. Imagine the effect these slogans have on the mind of an overpaid unionized patrolman who already resents the entire middle class for failing to give him the even higher salary he thinks he is entitled to.

Yes, yes, I am only talking about bad cops, though funnily enough they make up the overwhelming majority of the cops with whom I have dealt with in the past decade. But, if we did have any residual belief that we were citizens in a free country, these ad campaigns should eliminate them. But where is the outcry from elected officials?
NLM: McCrery Architects Design New Monastery for Carmelites of Wyoming

Gothic? I'm a surprised by the choice of architecture.

A pragmatic version of the gospel of vegetarianism

Monday, May 17, 2010

NLM: Medieval Version of the Salve Regina
The nephew apparently was very flirty with the Filipinas working on the cruise ship, and he was looking at and trying to get the attention of various women at Sweet Tomatoes today during lunch. How does he know that they are women?
Barbarian invasions, by Damien Perrotin

(original)

Peak energy makes things more complex, however. As the net energy available to society decreases, so will its capacity to support complex hierarchies. We can count on the ruling elites to pressure everyone and his dog so as to stay at the top, but ultimately they will fall. In the meantime , however, it will be the lower and middle classes which will hit the hardest. What that means for immigrants is that they will no longer be able, except for a few lucky individuals, to advance in society and will be permanently locked in underclass status. They will then have no reason to abandon the very real advantages of community solidarity for a more and more empty promise of integration.

Impoverished natives may and will then join immigrant culture – or rather what it will have become since it will quickly grow quite different of what it was at home – for protection and some form of advancement. This process is clearly at work in French society, even if it is marginal – racism and scapegoating is still the most common reaction.

As the crisis deepens and the middle class slips into permanent poverty, we may have a rather interesting “culture war” between whatever emerges from urban ghettos and a racism which in France may put on the mask of secularism – those who read French and will have look at this supposedly left wing blog will understand what I mean.

At some point in the process of decline, this is bound to generate a deep fracture in European societies, fracture which may take a territorial form, as it did in Britain, with an immigrant-based cultures prevailing in some areas and more native ones holding on in some others. Islamic polities may very well emerge in some French regions and large parts of Germany may very well become Turkish-speaking after the ultimate collapse of today's European states and of the elites which draw their power from them.

This is not necessarily a bad outcome. These futures societies and polities can become as rich and cultured as England did despite its rather troubled origin. The problem is that this process, probably inevitable at this point, will meet with a lot of resistance from natives, and more specifically from those authorities who will draw their legitimacy from today's polities. Racism and ethnic cleansing are bound to show their ugly head and make the unraveling of our civilization far messier and bloodier than it needs to be.

Ironically, it is the very refusal of the native majority to make place to immigrants and to integrate a part of their culture into their own which make this outcome all the more likely. This means, of course that ethnic regions – the Celtic Fringe for instance, but that is only an example – may be less vulnerable. Whatever polity emerge from them will likely draw its legitimacy from a supposed – even if often more fantasized than real – resistance to the state it is a part today. This may enable them to integrate large section of immigrant culture, as a part of a necessary culture change, without endangering themselves. An emirate of Britanny may exist in the future and, even if I'd prefer a Wiccan democracy, it would be as Breton as today's French region.

Even here, however, it is far from a forgone conclusion. In an atmosphere of nationalist ranting and stigmatization, it seems that the likes of Gildas will have a field day, paving the way for those of Cerdic and Creoda.


If what Mr. Perrotin predicts comes to pass, then he has presented the case why immigrants of different cultures and religions should not have been admitted into society in the first place. What can be done about it now?
Peter Hitchens, Police and 'Civilians'

I have been objecting for years to the stupid use of the term 'civilians' by some police officers, to describe the public. It reflects a growing and mistaken view in the police that they are a separate semi-military body, rather than - as they were intended to be - citizens in uniform. This is explored in my book 'The Abolition of Liberty' (and by the way, readers seeking to find my books in bookshops, as one says she sought to do, will generally be disappointed. Few bookshops will stock them, as the publishing and bookselling industry is almost completely dominated by left-wing persons. But they can be got by ordering them, provided you spell my name right, or you can go to the internet booksellers).

So I object to the term being used to describe a growing and worrying problem - the quiet replacement of proper, sworn constables with feebler and less effective 'PCSO's - 'Community Support Officers'. Even so it is a real problem. The sworn constable is not a civil servant. He is a directly appointed officer of the law, bound by oath to uphold and enforce the law without fear or favour - which for instance means he must refuse an illegal or unlawful order, and derives his powers from the local magistracy rather than from the central government.

The PCSO, whose powers are limited but will grow as time goes by, is a civil servant ultimately controlled by the state rather than the law (as are gendarmes in non-Common Law countries). This may seem a technical difference, but it is in fact essential to our liberty that the police are not an arm of government. In the English-speaking countries, we have the rule of law. In the civil code countries, they have the inferior rule of power.


I don't doubt that there is an important distinction between the police and the PCSOs. But is it just English/Whig propaganda to claim the civil code countries have the inferior rule of power?

wiki
Police Service Recruitment
PCSO Overview

Metropolitan Police Service
UK Police Service
Home Office
The Police|Home Office


BARWELL, UNITED KINGDOM - SEPTEMBER 30: A police community support officer patrols Bardon Road on September 30, 2009 in Barwell, United Kingdom. An inquest jury has returned a verdict of suicide on Fiona Pilkington and unlawful killing on her 18-year-old daughter Francecca who were plagued by boisterous youths on the estate where they live. An inquest jury found the family's cries for help to the authorities had been ignored. (Getty/Daylife)

LONDON - MAY 13: Home Secretary Theresa May and Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephens visit the York Road Estate, Clapham on May 13, 2010 in South West London, England. The Home Secretary said today that putting police back on the streets and slashing bureaucracy are among the Government's top priorities. (Getty/Daylife)
Daniel Larison, Palin Has No Political Future.

I hope that is the case...

Restoring Mayberry: The post-apocalypse movies we'd like to see

`Restoring Mayberry: The post-apocalypse movies we'd like to see

Wishful fantasies? Will people alter their lifestyles even if they knew the perils of peak oil? I doubt it.

2 by Sandro Magister

A Church Persecuted? Yes, by the Sins of Her Children

This is the "terrifying" relevance of the message of Fatima, according to Benedict XVI. But the last word in the story is the goodness of God. To be welcomed with penance and a spirit of conversion

Legion Leaders Absolve Themselves Before They Sink

In an internal memo, published here, they say they never knew anything about the double life of their founder, Maciel. But the judgment of the Vatican authorities says otherwise. The imminent appointment of the papal delegate

Giselle comments on the second piece.

RESTREPO - Sundance Film Festival 2010

Interview with co-directors Tim Hetherington & Sebastian Junger. RESTREPO.

Talk by Fr. Aidan Nichols, O.P.

Faith Matters - Lent 2010 - Fr Aidan Nichols

Faith Matters - Lent 2010 - Fr Aidan Nichols from Catholic Westminster on Vimeo.


(More videos from Catholic Westminster.)

(via Lawrence Lew [flickr])
Insight Scoop: Dr. Charles E. Rice's commencement address at Christendom College
Zenit: On the Feast of the Ascension
"The Lord, Taking the Road to Heaven, Gives Us a Foretaste of Divine Life"
How we wrecked the oceans
Dave Cohen, Decline of the Empire

Like the Indo-Aryan God Shiva, Destroyer of Worlds, marine ecologist Jeremy Jackson is here to turn your comfortable, complacent Mental World upside-down. He's able to do that because we are destroying the Physical World—in this case, the Earth's Oceans.

(original)



Selection from today's Counterpunch

Pam Martens, The Big Plunge: SEC Admits to Inadequate Tools to Conduct Investigation

Franklin C. Spinney, The Arrogance of Ignorance: a Roadmap to Folly in Afghanistan

Patrick Cockburn, Tunnel Darkens for Obama's Afghan War

Ralph Nader, Getting to Know Elena Kagan

Kathy Kelly/Joshua Brollier, Pressured From All Sides in Pakistan's Swat Valley


The Stanford Early Music Singers have a free concert coming June 2. Undoubtedly more details are to come.

Sunday, May 16, 2010

Jeff Taylor, Few v. Many: The Topsy-Turvy World of Judicial Demographics

John Dennis v. Dana Walsh

I just listened to a debate between John Dennis and Dana Walsh, who are both contending for nomination to be the Republican candidate running against Nancy Pelosi in November. (The 8th Congressional District.) Alas Ms. Walsh shares the same name as an ill-fated character on 24. Mr. Dennis is more of a libertarian while Ms. Walsh is more of a movement conservative. She wants to reduce government spending but she also supports neocon foreign policy. She also believes energy independence is possible and a goal to be pursued, while Mr. Dennis disagrees. Mr. Dennis unfortunately thinks autarky has been discredited for all goods, and shows now awareness of peak oil or the energy issues industrialized economies face. If I were living in the district I suppose I'd support Mr. Dennis over Ms. Walsh; he is more of a Ron Paul Republican. Despite his economic liberalism he is still a better choice than Ms. Pelosi. But I don't live in that district, so...



His youtube channel.

(Part 1 out of 7 total)


Her channel.
Today the house was visited by Chinese Jehovah's Witnesses and I was the only one home, so I answered the door. (It might have been better if I hadn't -- that's how I think as I write this.) So they made their pitch. At first I was going to listen to them and politely decline their literature, since I didn't really have time--I needed to finish breakfast and get ready for Sunday. But then I decided to actually respond to their questions and give some sort of defense of Catholic (and Jewish and Orthodox) practice regarding the Tetragammaton, God's name as He revealed it to Moses, as they harped on the subject one more time just as they were leaving. I should have asked them to look critically at the canonicity of Sacred Scripture and the question of authority, but I don't think they would have stuck around if I had. (We didn't even touch upon the Holy Trinity.) While we were talking (or while I was answering their questions) I think it was clear to them that they wouldn't be able to make a recruit here and so they were already set upon looking elsewhere. I don't think they'll come back.

I love the claim that they're not out to make converts or get people to change their religion -- they're just out spreading the Good News and telling people what God can do for us to help us with our problems.

I'll grant that they have zeal.
Robert George, Constitutionalism and Supreme Court Justices and Jurisprudence
I just read this piece by Fred Reed on Mexico and its US-imposed drug war: Meddling Where We Oughtn't Yet Again.

More Pedro de Escobar

2 pieces secular music by Pedro de Escobar


Pedro de Escobar (1465-1535) - In nativitate et Epiphanie Domini


VIRGEN BENDITA SIN PAR - Pedro de Escobar (c.1465 - c.1535)