Saturday, June 20, 2009

Future Weapons: Magpul Masada (Bushmaster ACR / Remington ACR)
Thomas Tallis - Miserere nostri

Friday, June 19, 2009

St. Gregory's University and Catholic Higher Education

official website
Fr. Z: Kids and summers, in which he writes, "I just heard a story on Fox News about Pres. Obama’s proposal to lengthen the school year for children."

In the comments--another recommendation for John Taylor Gatto's Underground History of American Education and Samuel Blumenfelds The NEA: Trojan Horse in American Education.

And Weapons of Mass Instruction.

From mid-century onwards certain utopian schemes to retard maturity in the interests of a greater good were put into play, following roughly the blueprint Rousseau laid down in the book Emile. At least rhetorically. The first goal, to be reached in stages, was an orderly, scientifically managed society, one in which the best people would make the decisions, unhampered by democratic tradition. After that, human breeding, the evolutionary destiny of the species, would be in reach. Universal institutionalized formal forced schooling was the prescription, extending the dependency of the young well into what had traditionally been early adult life. Individuals would be prevented from taking up important work until a relatively advanced age. Maturity was to be retarded.

(source)

FSVF video



FRATERNITA' DI SAN VINCENZO FERRIER

Convento di San Tommaso d'Aquino

IN COMUNIONE CON LA CHIESA CATTOLICA

2, route de Ballée
53340 Chémeré-le-Roi
(Francia)

Tel. + 33 02 43 98 64 25
Fax +33 02 43 98 49 19

Orari: 11.00 - 12.30 / 15.30 - 17.30 / 18.30 - 19.30 / 20.00 -20.30

www.chemere.org - fsvf@chemere.org
Litany of the Sacred Heart First Friday Benediction January 3, 2009 St. Margaret Mary Church Oakland, California, USA


Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - Revised (The music is not the actual litany, but something else, but I can find no information on it.)
Paul Gottfried, The Faileocons

In this contest of the generations, I stand entirely on the side of those with a future. My generation of rightists has wasted its chance for success. We can only point to humiliations, continued marginalization, and internecine strife as our war record. Nor have we provided much assistance to each other, unlike our enemies, who like the ancient Spartans as described by Xenophon, “suffer and rejoice together.” Most of my generation of paleos has done little to establish a sense of community. The more fortunate ones have husbanded their resources while doing next to nothing for their allies.

That the young are still groping for a way out of the wilderness is to their credit. It is also the privilege of youth to be looking for new paths, and especially given the failures of their quarrelsome elders. Charles has noticed the obvious here, that the “new paleos” have little to feel happy about as they view their country and most of the Western world in the grasp of cultural gravediggers and a reckless political class. Does he dispute the justification for this pessimism or the justification for the young paleos’ unwillingness to pretend that the solution for Obama is electing more GOP politicians? As for his censures about their sexual morals, which Charles may fear do not quite meet the standard of Trappist monks, I don’t see the licentiousness here that he does. None of the young paleos, to my knowledge, is leading a life of wine and roses. For one thing, they don’t have the disposable income for fun and games that their neoconservative enemies are being showered with. Moreover, compared to the philandering Catholic monarchist Charles Maurras, who spent most of his adult life tumbling from one mistress to the next, the “new paleos” seem to be models of Puritan sobriety.

Let me stir the pot further by drawing another distinction, between those who want to be political activists and those who do not. Many of the paleos I’ve listened to show an otherworldly side, when they’re not bashing each other in geriatric rage. They glorify Catholic monastic ideals or invoke the memories of Christian crusades. They complain ceaselessly about modern life and insist that we return to scholastic precepts and medieval models of social organization. But such advice cannot possibly resonate in the current climate of debate, and it is foolish to castigate those young people who wish to have impact on the present age for not following someone else’s nostalgic reveries.


About whom is he talking here?
From Rorate Caeli: Reminder for the Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus (Act of Reparation)
and You Report: Traditional Latin Mass in the San Francisco Bay Area
Beerdigung Ihrer Majestät Zita
John Zmirak talks about the Hapsburgs: Praying with the Kaisers (original at InsideCatholic.com), and mentions a movie I have not yet seen, Sunshine, starring Ralph Fiennes.



There is a shot of Ralph Fiennes lying next to his lover and acting like a beta--but that aside, the movie is on my to see list. Whoa, it's Jennifer Ehle playing the lover (wife?) -- I didn't recognize her.
Just saw the latest trailer for 2012. More disaster porn. I think it is unhealthy to have the desire to watch so much destruction and death on the silver screen. (And what of the 'creative' minds that choose to produce such 'art'?)

Does the CGI ruin the spectacle? It is difficult to say. At 2:06 you can see the fancy ships being built by the government to save a portion of the human race. (And at 2:31 you can see the White House being destroyed. Does Roland Emmerich have something against the White House?)

Is the movie anti-Christian? There is a shot of St. Peter's Basilica being toppled, and a lot of people praying at a vigil being killed. This by itself may not be anti-Christian, since a lot of other landmarks and buildings (like a Buddhist temple in Tibet) are wiped out too, but I think its inclusion in the movie does mean something to the movie, which is an indictment against God and His Providence. Human beings are subject to some impersonal force which wipes out the planet, and humans manage to survive only because of their ingenuity and "resilience."

What trash.
Andrew Peach, On the Demise of Fatherhood

Professor Peach was once at Boston College, and one of the "good guys" -- but this essay seems to be another example of philosophy wrongly posing as intellectual history. He sets out to explain the demise of fatherhood:

If there is to be any hope of stopping this societal hemorrhaging, then we must first identify the cause or causes of this decline in paternity. What exactly is making so many fathers abandon their posts?

I would like to propose that the demise of fatherhood is largely the result of a relatively recent and thoroughly unjustifiable faith in rational self-determination. Indeed, nearly all of the culprits that cultural observers have previously identified—contraceptives, abortion, women’s liberation, increased secularity, the usurpation of the functions of the father by the state—can probably best be understood as instances of this more general tendency.
An unjustifiable faith in rational self-determination... as opposed to original sin and disordered self-love? Do those who sin actually hold to some sort of ideology in order to justify their choices? Perhaps a few who think themselves educated and having ready justification for their actions. But what of the rest? How do we explain the choices that they make? And how much of an explanation do we need to give?

Philosophers are not content with looking at individual actions -- they must find a more general cause, some sort of intellectual trend or "big idea(s)," that explains the actions of many. In another time, the "unjustifiable faith in rational self-determination" would be linked by Catholic or conservative intellectuals to Renaissance humanism, or to modernism, or to liberalism and the Enlightenment -- the rise of "unfettered reason" and the triumph over tradition.

Instead, we should be looking at what goods people want, and how the culture justifies their priorities, if at all. We should also consider that there may be a difference between what people claim to be their system of morality and their actual decision-making process. Is it possible that their version of practical reason does not actually match the words that they parrot when asked about how right actions are distinguished from wrong ones?

We can also ask -- has everyone lost a sense of fatherhood as a duty and vocation equally? If we do ask that question, will we be accused of racism? It may be difficult to write a history of the factors that have lead to fatherhood being lost. How much proof do we need in order to be satisfied with an explanation of what is going on in our societies? We cannot achieve certainty with probable arguments, and it seems to me that the usefulness about such speculation is rather limited when dealing with the issue on the individual level or within government. (Even if there are plenty of think tanks and policy advocates that engage in such speculation when pushing for one agenda or another, or to simply raise awareness that a "problem" exists.)

In regard to paternity, the two most conspicuous and destructive instantiations of this unconstrained vision are voluntarism and functionalism.
He explains:

Voluntarism, the new and Constitutionally validated philosophical undergirding of parenthood, is the notion that no person has any special duties to any other person unless he has explicitly or implicitly consented to them. To be duty-bound for any other reason, such as circumstance or biological kinship, would be to find oneself despotically ruled by irrational forces. This notion lies at the heart of reproductive freedom, championed by organizations such as Planned Parenthood, whose very name echoes the unconstrained view. “Reproductive freedom—the fundamental right of every individual to decide freely and responsibly when and whether to have a child—is a reaffirmation of the principle of individual liberty cherished by most people worldwide,” declares the organization’s website.

and

Functionalism, for lack of a better term, is the legal and cultural notion that fatherhood is only incidentally related to biology and that the traditional functions of a father can be fulfilled through a patchwork of other relations or surrogates. On this view, there is little that is distinctive or even significant about a biological father’s relation to his son. On paper, it would appear that all of the functions of a father—providing affection, attention, protection, financial support—could be carried out by anyone or any group. How could something as incidental as a genetic link between two people possibly determine so much?
What of the impact of radical feminism? Or of the Second World War? Or the growth of an industralized and centralized state? In addition to personal sin, should we also consider whether some sort of emasculation has taken place? The lack or failure of male leadership, specifically the headship of the husband and father. Some may claim that how a man acts as a husband is separate from how he acts as a father, but perhaps there is more of a connection between the two than one might initially think. Often it is the case that a father no longer husbands the household. Being an 'adherent' of consumerism, he does little more than train his children to be good little consumers. There is very little exposure of them to the ethical life. How many fathers fail to give their children the moral formation that they require?

Professor Peach goes on to admit that for the average man, voluntarism and functionalism are not a necessary part of their worldview:
The devastation wrought by voluntarism and functionalism on the human family has been incalculable, but for the average man the unconstrained vision usually never rises to the level of these sophisticated -isms, however much they continue to poison the culture. What has caused the most damage to fatherhood is the simple fact that this age insists that anything outside of the control of the human will is intolerable. And at bottom, success in fatherhood involves faith; it is something outside of the control of the human will. If the success of one of society’s most fundamental and critical roles depended on rational self-determination, then civilization would have come apart long ago. And now that it is being claimed that success in fatherhood must be the product of wise planning, we should not be surprised to see civilization coming apart.
He gives a rather odd account of tradition:

In Sowell’s language, the wisdom embodied in fatherhood is “systemic knowledge,” knowledge acquired from the accumulated experience of previous generations. The rituals, customs, and rules of conduct that have been bequeathed to us by our predecessors are not principally products of reason; rather, they are embodiments of the successful adaptations that humans have made to their surroundings in the past. Not being the express product of a given individual, these adaptations are rarely understood in full by any given individual.
What explains tradition? Its success in promoting human... flourishing? "We keep it primarily because it works." Perhaps this is compatible with certain anthropological/sociological/evolutionary psychological theories of [human] culture, but is human history generally marked by decline or by progress? Who is to say that our ancestors didn't have a better awareness of the reasons set forth within tradition?

The secular holiday of Father's Day may be an appropriate occasion to ask why we do not have enough good fathers. But trying to analyze the root of the problem through the history of ideas does not seem to me to be an effective way to proceed. (And I'll grant that Professor Peach does not limit himself to that approach, but I view this fact as being an tacit admission that it is not enough for the audience.)

Palestrina - Heu mihi Domine

Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus 2009

The feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus is the Friday following the Second Sunday after Pentecost.

SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Sacred Heart of Jesus
THE SACRED HEART

From Women for Faith and Family.

(source)

(source, alt)

(source)

Sacred Heart Litany
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Thursday, June 18, 2009

The procession of the Ceremony of the Garter 2009

Zenit: Pope's Letter on Year for Priests



(source)
The Life of St Jean-Marie Vianney
Catholic Encyclopedia

Google Books: Fr. Rutler, Saint John Vianney: the Curé d'Ars today

Shrine of St. John Vianney - Ars, France
Sanctuaire d'Ars
Diocèse de Belley-Ars
H. C. Johns, Polis, Character, Localism

Mr. Johns makes similar points to what I have written here regarding subsidiarity.
Food Renegade: Wendell Berry Picks Jail Over NAIS
AICN: Frank Marshall Updates On INDY 5! The Script Is "Progressing"!
More Photos From ROBIN HOOD's Shoot!!
Open Wide For MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE IV!!!
AICN Anime - Final Fantasy: Advent Children Complete, Detroit Metal City, Evangelion and More...

Another Space Battleship Yamato movie?
Survival isn't cost-effective
by John Michael Greer

Trooping the Colour 2009

Rehearsal videos--
Trooping the Colour 2009


The Major General's Review of Trooping the Colour 2009



HM The Queen's Birthday -- Trooping the Colour 2009
Trooping the Colour 2009 UK - The Queens Official Birthday - Fighter Jets Fly Past
Wha'll be King but Charlie


Canadian and Cuban Celtic Musicians in Old Havana


Her official website. Myspace.
Chrissy Crowley Band channel

They need to update their channel more often!!!

Photos: The Bundeswehr in Afhganistan


Soldiers of German armed forces Bundeswehr secure the airfield outside the German army camp in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan April 17, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Afghan boys approach a German armed forces Bundeswehr soldiers during their patrol outside the German camp in Kunduz, northern Afghanistan April 16, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

An Afghan men leaves a meeting of tribe leaders and members of a German liaison managing team (LMT) as a group of German armed forces Bundeswehr military police guard the entrance of the office of the district manager of Aliabad near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr military policeman opens a gate for Afghan youth as he escorts a German liaison managing team (LMT) visiting a little village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr hunting infantry soldier prepares for a night mission in a forward operation base (FOB) in Kunduz April 20, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr hunting infantry soldier prepares for a night mission in a forward operation base (FOB) in Kunduz April 20, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr soldier instructs his sniffing dog for an improvised explosive device (IOD) search in Kunduz April 20, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr military policeman guards a meeting with a Bundeswehr liaison managing team (LMT) at a village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A Afghan boy looks at a German armed forces Bundeswehr member during the visit of a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) at a village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A German armed forces Bundeswehr policeman checks his radio at he guards the visit of a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) at a little village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

German armed forces Bundeswehr hunting infantry soldiers prepare for a night mission in a forward operation base (FOB) in Kunduz April 20, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Villagers walk past a German armed forces Bundeswehr major guarding the visit of a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) at a village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

German armed forces Bundeswehr soldiers walk their sniffer dogs before searching for improvised explosive devices (IOD) in Kunduz April 20, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Villagers follow a German armed forces Bundeswehr policeman guarding the visit of a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) at a village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Afghan children talk to German armed forces Bundeswehr policemen guarding the visit of a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) at a little village in Aliabad district near Kunduz on April 19, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Infantry soldiers of German armed forces Bundeswehr unload ammunition from a supply truck at their forward operation base (FOB) during a mission in Kunduz province, April 21, 2009.(Reuters/Daylife)

An infantry soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr checks his weapon as the soldiers secure a forward operation base (FOB) during a mission in Kunduz province, April 21, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Infantry soldiers of German armed forces Bundeswehr have a chat at their forward operation base (FOB) during a mission in Kunduz province, April 21, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

The equipment of an infantry soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr is displayed before a mission outside the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) camp in Kunduz, April 25, 2009. The equipment which includes a bullet proof vest, weapons, ammunition, first aid kit and water weighs about 40 kilograms (88 pounds). (Reuters/Daylife)


An infantry soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr presents the equipment he has to take for a mission outside the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) camp in Kunduz, April 25, 2009. The equipment which includes a bullet proof vest, weapons, ammunition, first aid kit and water weighs about 40 kilograms (88 pounds). (Reuters/Daylife)

A fully-equipped infantry soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr poses for a picture to present his gear before a mission outside the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) camp in Kunduz, April 25, 2009. The equipment which includes a bullet proof vest, weapons, ammunition, first aid kit and water weighs about 40 kilograms (88 pounds).

Afghan men look at a German armed forces Bundeswehr liason monitoring team (LMT) visiting their village in Kunduz province, April 26, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A soldier of the German armed forces Bundeswehr observes the area as he secures a liason monitoring team (LMT) during a visit to a village in Kunduz province, April 26, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr secures the area for a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) to make their way into a village in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Soldiers of the German armed forces Bundeswehr secure the area as a German liason monitoring team (LMT) walks into a village in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A soldier of the German armed forces Bundeswehr observes the area as villagers look at other Bundeswehr soldiers who are performing a recovery operation on a "Fuchs" armoured personnel carrier during a mission in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Afghan from Dam Shak-Alchin village help soldiers of the German armed forces Bundeswehr perform a recovery operation on a "Fuchs" armoured personnel carrier during a mission in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

A soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr secures the area as a German liason monitoring team (LMT) walks into a village in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009.

A soldier of German armed forces Bundeswehr secures the area for a German liaison monitoring team (LMT) to make their way into a village in Kunduz district, April 28, 2009. (Reuters/Daylife)

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

William Lind, Washington’s Legitimacy Crisis

Instead of a restored Vermont Republic, Cascadia, and perhaps a new Confederacy, if America breaks up it is likely to do so along non-geographic lines. Fourth Generation theory suggests that the new primary identities for which people are likely to vote, work, and fight will not be geographical. Rather, they will be cultural, religious, racial or ethnic, ideological, etc. Following the sorts of massacres, ethnic cleansings, pogroms, and genocides such Fourth Generation civil wars usually involve, new geographically defined states may emerge. But their borders will derive from cultural divides more than geographic ones.

The fact that a second American civil war would be nastier than the first – itself no picnic – does not mean it won’t happen. That depends on whether the Washington Establishment can recognize it has a legitimacy problem, get its act together and provide competent governance. It is currently failing that test, and I expect it to continue to fail. Any member of the Establishment who dares subordinate court politics to the good of the nation or advocates more than very modest change quickly finds he is no longer a member of the Establishment.

Why do the wicked flourish?


Do things really seem that bad? Perhaps they are not. But it is frustrating to be unable to find work even though one is qualified (perhaps over-qualified) for it. The manager seem to be preparing to marry his live-in gf. One sees various documents and diocesan paperwork. When was the last time he went to church? Those who co-habitate and have premarital relations seem able to get a decent wedding in the diocese without too many problems.

There are those who do not follow the 'rules' and yet seem to be doing fine. Many have grappled with the question of why the wicked seem to be doing ok, while those who strive to be obedient do not. Saints have written on the topic. So we keep in mind what our Lord tells us, especially the parable of the prodigal son and God's loving care of both the just and the unjust (which goes along with the story of Jonah). When things are not working out, it is easy to forget what benefits what have received, and instead focus on the benefits that others have received. Now if only I were as righteous as the elder brother in the parable.

It may be that God keeps some in ignorance so that their culpability is lessened or taken away. Those who know the truth should not be jealous, thinking that they too should not have been given onerous requirements. This would be ingratitude. Rather, God has given both the precepts and the grace to follow them, and a greater benefit as well--true happiness, so long as one cooperates with that grace.

Still, there is something to be said for the proper Church authorities making the proper censures when necessary, in order to protect the beginners who are easily scandalized, and may be tempted to fully embrace a life of sin, because "other Catholics are doing it." Even if anger is mixed with envy and exercising true charity is the solution, should the Church be giving special (or even "equal" treatment) to those who knowingly live in opposition to her teachings, to the point that that she seems to be approving their choices in life?
AsiaNews: Card. Zen: It is time to put into effect the Popes Letter to China’s Catholics, whatever the cost
AsiaTimes: Bad times good for Macau mogul Ho
The former holder of Macau's gambling monopoly looked like yesterday's man as American newcomers built megaresorts that dwarfed his flagship Hotel Lisboa. But as the bubble bursts, it's clear Stanley Ho knew best. - Muhammad Cohen
Paul Gottfried, Kaiser Bill: the workingman’s emperor

For the record, Kaiser Wilhelm II was not a socialist, as Preston would learn from reading Eberhard Straub’s study Kaiser Wilhelm II in der Politik seiner Zeit (2008). The last German emperor ruled over a highly decentralized federal state, in which most internal governance took place in the constituent administrations of the Empire, which were a collection of kingdoms, duchies, and free cities. The total tax burden for German citizens in 1900 was somewhere below 7 percent for those who were employed, which was the lowest tax rate in Europe at the time. Although the German working class was the most literate and enjoyed the highest living standard in the world, the German welfare state had hardly taken off in 1900, if one discounts modest workers’ pensions and something like medical insurance. Wilhelm described himself as a “Volkskaiser” and oozed sympathy for the German Arbeiterschaft, but he did not place his country on the road to Obamaism. And one suspects that at least some of his rhetoric about standing up for the workers was related to his concern that the Socialist Party of Germany, which was theoretically Marxist and which by 1914 had become the largest party in the Reichstag, would not become a true revolutionary force. By the way, I have never encountered the statement ascribed to Wilhelm, that he would support American socialists if they became Prussian militarists. It sounds like something The Weekly Standard would manufacture to kill two birds with one stone, by beating up on the Krauts for the umpteenth time while linking socialism to evil reactionaries.
Winslow T. Wheeler, How Obama Will Outspend Reagan on Defense
Zenit: More Proof of Hitler's Plan to Kill Pius XII
The Sixteen sing "Verbum caro factum est"

official website: The Sixteen - Harry Christophers
Incheon City Chorale - Mae-Na-Ri


Incheon City Chorale - Pal-so-Seong (Eight Laughters)

Incheon City Chorale

Photos: Trooping of the Colour, Thailand, Dec. 2008


A soldier runs after blowing a horn to signal the start of the annual Trooping of the Colour military parade in Bangkok December 2, 2008. (Reuters/Daylife)





Thailand's revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej attends the Trooping of the Colour, an annual military parade, in Bangkok's Royal Plaza on December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81-years-old on December 5. (Reuters/Daylife)

Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (C), accompanied by Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn (L) and Queen Sirikit, attends the Trooping of the Colour, an annual military parade, in Bangkok's Royal Plaza December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81 years old on December 5.
(Reuters/Daylife)

Royal guards men salute Thailand's revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej (3rd R) as he arrives to attend the Trooping of the Colour, an annual military parade, in Bangkok's Royal Plaza on December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81-years-old on December 5. Follow the King on the right is Queen Sirikit.
(Reuters/Daylife)

Thailand's revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej (L) and Queen Sirikit attend the annual Trooping of the Colour military parade in Bangkok's Royal Plaza December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81-years-old on December 5.
(Reuters/Daylife)

Thailand's revered King Bhumibol Adulyadej attends the annual Trooping of the Colour, an annual military parade, in Bangkok's Royal Plaza on December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81-years-old on December 5.
(Reuters/Daylife)


The guard of honour march in Bangkok's Royal Plaza as Thai King Bhumibol Adulyadej (unseen) attends the Trooping of the Colour, an annual military parade, December 2, 2008. The Thai King, the world's longest reigning monarch, will turn 81 years old on December 5.
(Reuters/Daylife)

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Classical strokes for younger folk ­- June 17, 2009

Old men in seonbi (traditional attire worn by Korean scholars wore in the Joseon Dynasty) teach children calligraphy in a front garden in Unhyeon Palace in Jongno, central Seoul, yesterday. [YONHAP]