Saturday, January 20, 2007

Riddley Walker

post-apocalyptic novel, referenced by a writer for New York Magazine.

Pete Takeshi have you read this?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I never read Riddley Walker, though it is referenced as being a pretty good post-apoc novel by the mainstream.

From what I've read on the nets about it, it looks like Canticle for Leibowitz but with less chant and more Loreena McKennitt. As far as extrapolating the 'devolution of English', well, the short story "Shores of Babylon" did it in 1937, and in under 1/20 the pagecount.

Side note: it's interesting to observe that the post-apocalyptic novel predates the Manhattan Project by at least fifteen years.

Anonymous said...

I never read Riddley Walker, though it is referenced as being a pretty good post-apoc novel by the mainstream.

From what I've read on the nets about it, it looks like Canticle for Leibowitz but with less chant and more Loreena McKennitt. As far as extrapolating the 'devolution of English', well, the short story "Shores of Babylon" did it in 1937, and in under 1/20 the pagecount.

Side note: it's interesting to observe that the post-apocalyptic novel predates the Manhattan Project by at least fifteen years.

Anonymous said...

I never read Riddley Walker, though it is referenced as being a pretty good post-apoc novel by the mainstream.

From what I've read on the nets about it, it looks like Canticle for Leibowitz but with less chant and more Loreena McKennitt. As far as extrapolating the 'devolution of English', well, the short story "Shores of Babylon" did it in 1937, and in under 1/20 the pagecount.

Side note: it's interesting to observe that the post-apocalyptic novel predates the Manhattan Project by at least fifteen years.

Anonymous said...

Had some problems with posting comments on here... sorry to spam you.

--P.T.